Definition of park verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    park

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//pɑːk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pɑːrk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they park
    BrE BrE//pɑːk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pɑːrk//
     
    he / she / it parks
    BrE BrE//pɑːks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pɑːrks//
     
    past simple parked
    BrE BrE//pɑːkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pɑːrkt//
     
    past participle parked
    BrE BrE//pɑːkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pɑːrkt//
     
    -ing form parking
    BrE BrE//ˈpɑːkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpɑːrkɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] park (something) to leave a vehicle that you are driving in a particular place for a period of time You can't park here. You can't park the car here. He's parked very badly. a badly parked truck A red van was parked in front of the house. a parked car (informal, figurative) Just park your bags in the hall until your room is ready. see also double-park
  2. 2[transitive] park yourself + adv./prep. (informal) to sit or stand in a particular place for a period of time She parked herself on the edge of the bed.
  3. 3[transitive] park something (business, informal) to decide to leave an idea or issue to be dealt with or considered at a later meeting Let's park that until our next meeting.
  4. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French parc, from medieval Latin parricus, of Germanic origin; related to German Pferch ‘pen, fold’, also to paddock. The word was originally a legal term designating land held by royal permission for keeping game animals: this was enclosed and therefore distinct from a forest or chase, and (also unlike a forest) had no special laws or officers. A military sense ‘space occupied by artillery, wagons, stores, etc., in an encampment’ (late 17th cent.) is the origin of the verb sense (mid 19th cent.) and of sense (2) (early 20th cent.).Extra examples All the cars were neatly parked on the street. Motorists parked illegally are fined £50. The police car was discreetly parked in the furthest corner of the courtyard. We were blocked in by a badly parked truck. You can’t park here. Phrasal Verbsˌpark ˈup
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: park