English

Definition of permit verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    permit

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//pəˈmɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈmɪt//
     
    (formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they permit
    BrE BrE//pəˈmɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈmɪt//
     
    he / she / it permits
    BrE BrE//pəˈmɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈmɪts//
     
    past simple permitted
    BrE BrE//pəˈmɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈmɪtɪd//
     
    past participle permitted
    BrE BrE//pəˈmɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈmɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form permitting
    BrE BrE//pəˈmɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈmɪtɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [transitive] to allow somebody to do something or to allow something to happen permit something Radios are not permitted in the library. There are fines for exceeding permitted levels of noise pollution. permit somebody/yourself something We were not permitted any contact with each other. Jim permitted himself a wry smile. permit somebody/yourself to do something Visitors are not permitted to take photographs. She would not permit herself to look at them. (formal) Permit me to offer you some advice. Express YourselfForbidding somebody to do somethingWhen speaking to somebody, we usually use indirect language to ask them not to do something: I'm sorry, smoking isn't allowed./You're not allowed to smoke here. Would you mind not talking during the music? Could I ask you not to use your phone here, please? I'm afraid I have to ask you not to take pictures here.
  2. 2  [intransitive, transitive] to make something possible We hope to visit the cathedral, if time permits. I'll come tomorrow, weather permitting (= if the weather is fine). permit something The password permits access to all files on the hard disk. The length of the report does not permit a detailed discussion of the problems. permit somebody/something to do something Cash machines permit you to withdraw money at any time.
  3. Word Origin late Middle English (originally in the sense ‘commit, hand over’): from Latin permittere, from per- ‘through’ + mittere ‘send, let go’.Extra examples Development is not normally permitted in conservation areas. The bill was designed to permit new fathers to take time off work. The bill was designed to permit workers to take up to twelve weeks’ unpaid leave annually for family reasons. A new constitution permitted the formation of political parties. He permitted himself a little smile. I’ll come tomorrow, weather permitting. People are breathing in more than five times the permitted level of pollutants. Permit me to make a suggestion. The banks were not permitted to invest overseas. The rules of the club do not permit it. They were permitted to stay in the country on humanitarian grounds.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: permit