Definition of persist verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    persist

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//pəˈsɪst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsɪst//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they persist
    BrE BrE//pəˈsɪst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsɪst//
     
    he / she / it persists
    BrE BrE//pəˈsɪsts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsɪsts//
     
    past simple persisted
    BrE BrE//pəˈsɪstɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsɪstɪd//
     
    past participle persisted
    BrE BrE//pəˈsɪstɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsɪstɪd//
     
    -ing form persisting
    BrE BrE//pəˈsɪstɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsɪstɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to continue to do something despite difficulties or opposition, in a way that can seem unreasonable persist (in doing something) Why do you persist in blaming yourself for what happened? persist (in something) She persisted in her search for the truth. persist (with something) He persisted with his questioning. + speech ‘So, did you agree or not?’ he persisted.
  2. 2[intransitive] to continue to exist The belief that the earth was flat persisted for many centuries. If the symptoms persist, consult your doctor.
  3. Word Origin mid 16th cent.: from Latin persistere, from per- ‘through, steadfastly’ + sistere ‘to stand’.Extra examples If symptoms persist for more than a few days, see a doctor. If you persist in upsetting her, I will have to punish you. The condition almost always persists beyond childhood. The depression persisted through much of the 1930s. The detective stubbornly persisted with his questions. The snows persisted until the second month of the new year. The trade network persisted in spite of the political chaos. These practices persisted into the Middle Ages. This situation cannot be allowed to persist. a belief that persists to this day the problems that persisted during the three-day conference
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: persist