Definition of plough verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

plough

 verb
(North American English plow)verb
BrE BrE//plaʊ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//plaʊ//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they plough
BrE BrE//plaʊ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//plaʊ//
 
he / she / it ploughs
BrE BrE//plaʊz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//plaʊz//
 
past simple ploughed
BrE BrE//plaʊd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//plaʊd//
 
past participle ploughed
BrE BrE//plaʊd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//plaʊd//
 
-ing form ploughing
BrE BrE//ˈplaʊɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈplaʊɪŋ//
 
Growing crops
 
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  • [transitive, intransitive] plough (something) to dig and turn over a field or other area of land with a plough ploughed fields CollocationsFarmingGrowing food and raising animals plant trees/​seeds/​crops/​vines/​barley grow/​produce corn/​wheat/​rice/​fruit plough/(North American English) plow land/​a field sow/​harvest seeds/​crops/​fields spread manure/​fertilizer on something cultivate/​irrigate/​water/​contaminate crops/​plants/​fields/​land damage/​destroy/​lose your crop ripen/​pick fruit/​berries/​grapes press/​dry/​ferment grapes grind/​thresh grain/​corn/​wheat raise/​rear/​keep chickens/​poultry/​cattle/​pigs raise/​breed/​feed/​graze livestock/​cattle/​sheep kill/​slaughter livestock preserve/​smoke/​cure/​salt meatModern farming run a fish farm/​an organic dairy engage in/​be involved in intensive (pig/​fish) farming use/​apply (chemical/​organic) fertilizer/​insecticides/​pesticides begin/​do/​conduct field trials of GM (= genetically modified) crops grow/​develop GM crops/​seeds/​plants/​foods fund/​invest in genetic engineering/​research improve/​increase crop yields face/​suffer from/​alleviate food shortages label food that contains GMOs (= genetically modified organisms) eliminate/​reduce farm subsidies oppose/​be against factory farming/​GM food promote/​encourage/​support organic/​sustainable farming See related entries: Growing crops
  • Word Origin late Old English plōh, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch ploeg and German Pflug. The spelling plough became common in England in the 18th cent.; earlier (16th–17th cents) the noun was normally spelled plough, the verb plow.Idioms
    plough a lonely, your own, etc., furrow
     
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    (literary) to do things that other people do not do, or be interested in things that other people are not interested in
    Phrasal Verbsplough back somethingplough into somebodyplough something into somethingplough on (with something)plough (your way) through somethingplough somethingup