Definition of pluck verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    pluck

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//plʌk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//plʌk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they pluck
    BrE BrE//plʌk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//plʌk//
     
    he / she / it plucks
    BrE BrE//plʌks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//plʌks//
     
    past simple plucked
    BrE BrE//plʌkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//plʌkt//
     
    past participle plucked
    BrE BrE//plʌkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//plʌkt//
     
    -ing form plucking
    BrE BrE//ˈplʌkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈplʌkɪŋ//
     
     
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    hair
  1. 1[transitive] pluck something (out) to pull out hairs with your fingers or with tweezers She plucked out a grey hair. expertly plucked eyebrows
  2. chicken, etc.
  3. 2[transitive] pluck something to pull the feathers off a dead bird, for example a chicken, in order to prepare it for cooking
  4. musical instrument
  5. 3(North American English also pick) [transitive, intransitive] pluck (at) something to play a musical instrument, especially a guitar, by pulling the strings with your fingers to pluck the strings of a violin He took the guitar and plucked at the strings.
  6. remove somebody/something
  7. 4[transitive] pluck somebody (from something) (to something) to remove somebody from a place or situation, especially one that is unpleasant or dangerous Police plucked a drowning girl from the river yesterday. Survivors of the wreck were plucked to safety by a helicopter. She was plucked from obscurity to instant stardom.
  8. 5[transitive] pluck something (from something) to take hold of something and remove it by pulling it He plucked the wallet from the man's grasp.
  9. fruit/flower
  10. 6[transitive] pluck something (from something) (old-fashioned or literary) to pick a fruit, flower, etc. from where it is growing I plucked an orange from the tree.
  11. Word Origin late Old English ploccian, pluccian, of Germanic origin; related to Flemish plokken; probably from the base of Old French (es)peluchier ‘to pluck’.Extra examples He plucked the wallet from the man’s grasp. Her eyebrows had been plucked and pencilled. Rescuers managed to pluck the girl from the water. Survivors were plucked to safety by a helicopter.Idioms
    pluck something out of the air
     
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    to say a name, number, etc. without thinking about it, especially in answer to a question I just plucked a figure out of the air and said : ‘Would £1 000 seem reasonable to you?’
    pluck up (the) courage (to do something)
     
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    to make yourself do something even though you are afraid to do it I finally plucked up the courage to ask her for a date.
    Phrasal Verbspluck at something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: pluck