Definition of postpone verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

postpone

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//pəˈspəʊn//
 
; NAmE NAmE//poʊˈspoʊn//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they postpone
BrE BrE//pəˈspəʊn//
 
; NAmE NAmE//poʊˈspoʊn//
 
he / she / it postpones
BrE BrE//pəˈspəʊnz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//poʊˈspoʊnz//
 
past simple postponed
BrE BrE//pəˈspəʊnd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//poʊˈspoʊnd//
 
past participle postponed
BrE BrE//pəˈspəʊnd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//poʊˈspoʊnd//
 
-ing form postponing
BrE BrE//pəˈspəʊnɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//poʊˈspoʊnɪŋ//
 
Business meetings
 
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to arrange for an event, etc. to take place at a later time or date synonym put off postpone something The game has already been postponed three times. postpone something to/until something We'll have to postpone the meeting until next week. They have agreed to postpone repayment of the loan to a future unspecified date. postpone doing something It was an unpopular decision to postpone building the new hospital. compare cancel More Like This Verbs usually followed by -ing forms avoid, consider, delay, deny, enjoy, escape, finish, give up, imagine, involve, mention, mind, miss, postpone, practise, resist, risk, suggestSee worksheet. See related entries: Business meetings Word Origin late 15th cent.: from Latin postponere, from post ‘after’ + ponere ‘to place’.Extra examples Ruth wrote at once, asking Maria to postpone her visit. The event has been postponed indefinitely due to lack of interest. The game has been postponed from Wednesday night to Friday night. The inevitable conflict was merely postponed till the next meeting. The meeting has been postponed until next week. We’ll have to postpone the meeting until next week.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: postpone