Definition of prejudice verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    prejudice

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈpredʒudɪs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpredʒudɪs//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they prejudice
    BrE BrE//ˈpredʒudɪs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpredʒudɪs//
     
    he / she / it prejudices
    BrE BrE//ˈpredʒudɪsɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpredʒudɪsɪz//
     
    past simple prejudiced
    BrE BrE//ˈpredʒudɪst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpredʒudɪst//
     
    past participle prejudiced
    BrE BrE//ˈpredʒudɪst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpredʒudɪst//
     
    -ing form prejudicing
    BrE BrE//ˈpredʒudɪsɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpredʒudɪsɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1prejudice somebody (against somebody/something) to influence somebody so that they have an unfair or unreasonable opinion about somebody/something synonym bias The prosecution lawyers have been trying to prejudice the jury against her.
  2. 2prejudice something (formal) to have a harmful effect on something Any delay will prejudice the child's welfare.
  3. Word Origin Middle English (originally as a legal term): from Old French, from Latin praejudicium, from prae ‘in advance’ + judicium ‘judgement’.Extra examples Newspaper reports had unfairly prejudiced the jury in her favour/​favor. She did not disclose evidence that was likely to prejudice her client’s case. This could seriously prejudice her safety. Any delay will prejudice the child’s welfare. I can’t comment on that as I don’t wish to prejudice the outcome of the talks. Poor handwriting might prejudice people against the applicant. Some argued that the media attention had prejudiced the jury.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: prejudice