Definition of preside verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

preside

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//prɪˈzaɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzaɪd//
 
[intransitive](formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they preside
BrE BrE//prɪˈzaɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzaɪd//
 
he / she / it presides
BrE BrE//prɪˈzaɪdz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzaɪdz//
 
past simple presided
BrE BrE//prɪˈzaɪdɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzaɪdɪd//
 
past participle presided
BrE BrE//prɪˈzaɪdɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzaɪdɪd//
 
-ing form presiding
BrE BrE//prɪˈzaɪdɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzaɪdɪŋ//
 
 
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to lead or be in charge of a meeting, ceremony, etc. the presiding judge preside at/over something They asked if I would preside at the committee meeting. (figurative) The party presided over one of the worst economic declines in the country's history (= it was in power when the decline happened). Word Origin early 17th cent.: from French présider, from Latin praesidere, from prae ‘before’ + sedere ‘sit’.Extra examples Judge Charles Watkins presided over the appeal hearing. The Archbishop presided at a special mass in the city’s cathedral. The presiding judge was Mr Justice Williamson.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: preside