Definition of presume verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    presume

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//prɪˈzjuːm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzuːm//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they presume
    BrE BrE//prɪˈzjuːm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzuːm//
     
    he / she / it presumes
    BrE BrE//prɪˈzjuːmz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzuːmz//
     
    past simple presumed
    BrE BrE//prɪˈzjuːmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzuːmd//
     
    past participle presumed
    BrE BrE//prɪˈzjuːmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzuːmd//
     
    -ing form presuming
    BrE BrE//prɪˈzjuːmɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈzuːmɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to suppose that something is true, although you do not have actual proof synonym assume They are very expensive, I presume? ‘Is he still abroad?’ ‘I presume so.’ presume (that)… I presumed (that) he understood the rules. it is presumed that… Little is known of the youngest son; it is presumed that he died young. presume somebody/something to be/have something I presumed him to be her husband.
  2. 2[transitive] to accept that something is true until it is shown not to be true, especially in court presume somebody/something + adj. Twelve passengers are missing, presumed dead. In English law, a person is presumed innocent until proved guilty. presume something We must presume innocence until we have proof of guilt. presume somebody/something to be/have something We must presume them to be innocent until we have proof of guilt.
  3. 3[transitive] presume something (formal) to accept something as true or existing and to act on that basis The course seems to presume some previous knowledge of the subject.
  4. 4[intransitive] presume to do something (formal) to behave in a way that shows a lack of respect by doing something that you have no right to do I wouldn't presume to tell you how to run your own business.
  5. Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French presumer, from Latin praesumere ‘anticipate’ (in late Latin ‘take for granted’), from prae ‘before’ + sumere ‘take’.Extra examples I had presumed wrongly that Jenny would be there. They must be presumed innocent until proven guilty. ‘Is he still abroad?’ ‘I presume so.’ I presumed her to be his daughter. I presumed that he understood the rules. I wouldn’t presume to tell you how to run your own business. In English law, a person is presumed innocent until proven guilty. The class presumes some previous knowledge of the subject. They presume that a woman’s partner is supporting her financially, whether this is true or not. Twelve passengers are missing, presumed dead. Phrasal Verbspresume on somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: presume

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