English

Definition of prevail verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    prevail

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//prɪˈveɪl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈveɪl//
     
    (formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they prevail
    BrE BrE//prɪˈveɪl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈveɪl//
     
    he / she / it prevails
    BrE BrE//prɪˈveɪlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈveɪlz//
     
    past simple prevailed
    BrE BrE//prɪˈveɪld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈveɪld//
     
    past participle prevailed
    BrE BrE//prɪˈveɪld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈveɪld//
     
    -ing form prevailing
    BrE BrE//prɪˈveɪlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈveɪlɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] prevail (in/among something) to exist or be very common at a particular time or in a particular place We were horrified at the conditions prevailing in local prisons. Those beliefs still prevail among certain social groups.
  2. 2[intransitive] prevail (against/over something) (of ideas, opinions, etc.) to be accepted, especially after a struggle or an argument synonym triumph Justice will prevail over tyranny. Fortunately, common sense prevailed.
  3. 3[intransitive] prevail (against/over somebody) to defeat an opponent, especially after a long struggle
  4. Word Origin late Middle English: from Latin praevalere ‘have greater power’, from prae ‘before’ + valere ‘have power’.Extra examples Her happy outlook always prevailed. His view eventually prevailed over theirs. The wishes of 20 million people ought to prevail against those of 200 thousand. In a one-sided final, Spain prevailed against title-holder Croatia 40–34. The Act requires the will of the Commons ultimately to prevail over that of the upper house. They wasted two penalties but still prevailed 2–1. Ultimately, Rome prevailed over her neighbours. Phrasal Verbsprevail on somebody to do something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: prevail

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