English

Definition of publish verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    publish

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈpʌblɪʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpʌblɪʃ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they publish
    BrE BrE//ˈpʌblɪʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpʌblɪʃ//
     
    he / she / it publishes
    BrE BrE//ˈpʌblɪʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpʌblɪʃɪz//
     
    past simple published
    BrE BrE//ˈpʌblɪʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpʌblɪʃt//
     
    past participle published
    BrE BrE//ˈpʌblɪʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpʌblɪʃt//
     
    -ing form publishing
    BrE BrE//ˈpʌblɪʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈpʌblɪʃɪŋ//
     
    Writing and publishing, Using the Internet, Websites, Journalism
     
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  1. 1  [transitive] publish something to produce a book, magazine, CD-ROM, etc. and sell it to the public The first edition was published in 2007. He works for a company that publishes reference books. Most of our titles are also published on CD-ROM. Wordfinderbiography, blockbuster, book, character, editor, narrator, novel, plot, publish, title See related entries: Writing and publishing
  2. 2  [transitive] publish something to print a letter, an article, etc. in a newspaper or magazine Pictures of the suspect were published in all the daily papers. The editors published a full apology in the following edition. See related entries: Journalism
  3. 3  [transitive] publish something to make something available to the public on the Internet The report will be published on the Internet. See related entries: Using the Internet, Websites
  4. 4  [transitive, intransitive] publish (something) (of an author) to have your work printed and sold to the public She hasn't published anything for years. University teachers are under pressure to publish.
  5. 5[transitive] publish something (formal) to make official information known to the public synonym release The findings of the committee will be published on Friday.
  6. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘make generally known’): from the stem of Old French puplier, from Latin publicare ‘make public’, from publicus, blend of poplicus ‘of the people’ (from populus ‘people’) and pubes ‘adult’.Extra examples He has published extensively on medieval education. Her books have never been widely published in the US. Her last book was published posthumously in 1948. The press should be free to publish and comment on all aspects of political and social life. The study was published online. a newly published series of essays She hasn’t published anything for years. The first edition was published in 1998.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: publish

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