English

Definition of pursue verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    pursue

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//pəˈsjuː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsuː//
     
    (formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they pursue
    BrE BrE//pəˈsjuː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsuː//
     
    he / she / it pursues
    BrE BrE//pəˈsjuːz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsuːz//
     
    past simple pursued
    BrE BrE//pəˈsjuːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsuːd//
     
    past participle pursued
    BrE BrE//pəˈsjuːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsuːd//
     
    -ing form pursuing
    BrE BrE//pəˈsjuːɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//pərˈsuːɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1  pursue something to do something or try to achieve something over a period of time to pursue a goal/an aim/an objective We intend to pursue this policy with determination. She wishes to pursue a medical career.
  2. 2  pursue something | + speech to continue to discuss, find out about or be involved in something to pursue legal action We have decided not to pursue the matter.
  3. 3  pursue somebody/something to follow or chase somebody/something, especially in order to catch them She left the theatre, hotly pursued by the press. Police pursued the car at high speed. Jake has been pursuing her (= trying to have a relationship with her) for months.
  4. Word Origin Middle English (originally in the sense ‘follow with hatred’): from Anglo-Norman French pursuer, from an alteration of Latin prosequi ‘prosecute’.Extra examples He ran past, hotly pursued by two policemen. He was still doggedly pursuing his studies. How can we most effectively pursue these aims? How do you decide which career you wish to pursue? I decided the matter was not worth pursuing further. We have decided not to pursue the matter further. the freedom to pursue her own interests She drove away, hotly pursued by the photographers. We have no option but to pursue legal action.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: pursue