Definition of rage verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    rage

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//reɪdʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//reɪdʒ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they rage
    BrE BrE//reɪdʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//reɪdʒ//
     
    he / she / it rages
    BrE BrE//ˈreɪdʒɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈreɪdʒɪz//
     
    past simple raged
    BrE BrE//reɪdʒd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//reɪdʒd//
     
    past participle raged
    BrE BrE//reɪdʒd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//reɪdʒd//
     
    -ing form raging
    BrE BrE//ˈreɪdʒɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈreɪdʒɪŋ//
     
    Anger
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to show that you are very angry about something or with somebody, especially by shouting synonym rail rage (at/against/about somebody/something) He raged against the injustice of it all. + speech ‘That's unfair!’ she raged. See related entries: Anger
  2. 2[intransitive] rage (on) (of a storm, a battle, an argument, etc.) to continue in a violent way The riots raged for three days. The blizzard was still raging outside.
  3. 3[intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) (of an illness, a fire, etc.) to spread very quickly Forest fires were raging out of control. A flu epidemic raged through Europe.
  4. 4[intransitive] (Australian English, New Zealand English, slang) to go out and enjoy yourself
  5. Word Origin Middle English (also in the sense ‘madness’): from Old French rage (noun), rager (verb), from a variant of Latin rabies, from rabere ‘rave’.Extra examples Even the dogs were quiet while the heated quarrel raged around them. Fire raged through the forest. I raged inwardly against his injustice. She tried to control the fury raging within her. She was still raging about the treatment she had received. The argument still rages on. The storm raged unabated. The team was left raging at the referee’s decision.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: rage