English

Definition of ram verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    ram

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ræm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ræm//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they ram
    BrE BrE//ræm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ræm//
     
    he / she / it rams
    BrE BrE//ræmz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ræmz//
     
    past simple rammed
    BrE BrE//ræmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ræmd//
     
    past participle rammed
    BrE BrE//ræmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ræmd//
     
    -ing form ramming
    BrE BrE//ˈræmɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈræmɪŋ//
     
    Driving
     
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  1. 1ram something (of a vehicle, a ship, etc.) to drive into or hit another vehicle, ship, etc. with force, sometimes deliberately Two passengers were injured when their taxi was rammed from behind by a bus. See related entries: Driving
  2. 2ram something + adv./prep. to push something somewhere with force She rammed the key into the lock. (figurative) The spending cuts had been rammed through Congress.
  3. Word Origin Old English ram(m), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch ram.Extra examples People are sick of having advertising rammed down their throats. He rammed his foot down hard on the brake. Her hat was rammed down over her forehead. I rammed a chair under the door handle.Idioms
    force/thrust/ram something down somebody’s throat
     
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    (informal) to try to force somebody to listen to and accept your opinions in a way that they find annoying
    (especially British English) to emphasize an idea, argument, etc. very strongly to make sure people listen to it The ads are intended to ram home the dangers of driving too fast in fog.
    Phrasal Verbsram into something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: ram