English

Definition of range noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    range

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//reɪndʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//reɪndʒ//
     
    In the kitchen
     
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    variety
  1. 1  [countable, usually singular] range (of something) a variety of things of a particular type The hotel offers a wide range of facilities. There is a full range of activities for children. This material is available in a huge range of colours.
  2. limits
  3. 2  [countable, usually singular] the limits between which something varies Most of the students are in the 17–20 age range. There will be an increase in the range of 0 to 3 per cent. It's difficult to find a house in our price range (= that we can afford). This was outside the range of his experience.
  4. of products
  5. 3  [countable] a set of products of a particular type our new range of hair products see also mid-range, top of the range
  6. distance
  7. 4  [countable, uncountable] the distance over which something can be seen or heard The child was now out of her range of vision (= not near enough for her to see).
  8. 5  [countable, uncountable] the distance over which a gun or other weapon can hit things These missiles have a range of 300 miles. see also close-range, long-range, short-range
  9. 6[countable] the distance that a vehicle will travel before it needs more fuel
  10. of mountains
  11. 7[countable] a line or group of mountains or hills the great mountain range of the Alps
  12. for shooting
  13. 8[countable] an area of land where people can practise shooting or where bombs, etc. can be tested a shooting range A device was exploded at the main nuclear testing range. see also driving range, rifle range
  14. oven
  15. 9[countable] a large piece of equipment that can burn various fuels and is kept hot all the time, used for cooking, especially in the past See related entries: In the kitchen
  16. 10(North American English) = stove Cook the meat on a low heat on top of the range.
  17. for cows
  18. 11the range [singular] (North American English) a large open area for keeping cows, etc.
  19. see also free-range
    Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘line of people or animals’): from Old French range ‘row, rank’, from rangier ‘put in order’, from rang ‘rank’. Early usage also included the notion of ‘movement over an area’.Extra examples Come and see our new range of furniture. Don’t shoot yet—he’s still out of range. For more information about our product range, call your local branch. He hit balls on the practice range yesterday. He shot her at point-blank range. I listened, but the voices were just out of hearing range. It’s outside my range of vision. Many chefs prefer to cook on a gas rather than an electric range. Many factors limit women’s range of job choices. Most of the students are in the 17–21 age range. No, that’s completely outside my price range. Our comprehensive range of benefits includes pension and health insurance. Students can choose from a wide range of options. The artists have been chosen to represent a range of styles. The books cover the full range of reading abilities. The company is launching a new range of cosmetics. The experiments show a surprisingly wide range of results. The level of mistakes is within the acceptable range of standards for a public organization. The missiles are effective over a long range. The receiver has a maximum range of about 30 feet. The trade show will feature an enormous range of goods. There is considerable variation in ability across the range. These books are designed to extend the range of children’s language. They stock a very wide range of garden products. This car is beyond the range of most people’s pockets. This is a top of the range refrigerator. We provide a full range of financial services. You can enjoy an excellent range of leisure and sporting facilities. a broad range of abilities a gun for precision shooting at medium range an 18-bay floodlit driving range people from a diverse range of backgrounds shooting ranges where competitors shoot at targets the other models in their new range trying to extend the range of children’s language It’s difficult to find a house in our price range. The child was now out of Penny’s range of vision. The hotel offers a wide range of facilities and services. The students in Class 4 have a very wide range of abilities. There will be an increase in the range of 0 to 3 per cent. This material is available in a huge range of colours. This was outside the range of his experience.Idioms
    in/within range (of something)
     
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     near enough to be reached, seen or heard He shouted angrily at anyone within range.
    out of range (of something)
     
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     too far away to be reached, seen or heard The cat stayed well out of range of the children. She hid away in her house, out of range of prying eyes.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: range