Definition of reality noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    reality

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//riˈæləti//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//riˈæləti//
     
    (pl. realities)
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1  [uncountable] the true situation and the problems that actually exist in life, in contrast to how you would like life to be She refuses to face reality. You're out of touch with reality. The reality is that there is not enough money to pay for this project. They seemed to have the perfect marriage but the reality was very different.
  2. 2  [countable] a thing that is actually experienced or seen, in contrast to what people might imagine the harsh realities of life This decision reflects the realities of the political situation. The paperless office is still far from being a reality. Will time travel ever become a reality?
  3. 3[uncountable] reality television/TV/shows/series/contestants television/shows, etc. that use real people (not actors) in real situations, presented as entertainment a reality TV star the reality show ‘Big Brother’
  4. Word Origin late 15th cent.: via French from medieval Latin realitas, from late Latin realis ‘relating to things’, from Latin res ‘thing’.Extra examples He has a rather tenuous grasp of reality. He has no illusions about the underlying reality of army life. Her parents always tried to shield her from the realities of the world. I don’t think he understands the reality of the situation. I don’t think you have quite grasped the realities of our situation! It’s our task to make the proposals a reality. It’s time for a reality check: are these goals really achievable? Most comedy relies on distorting reality. Most people’s ideas of the disease do not have much to do with the reality. One day her dream will become a reality. Painters at the time were largely concerned with reproducing external reality. She will have to face reality sooner or later. The director creates a believable, gritty reality. The media portray her as happy and successful, but in reality she has a difficult life. The movie portrays a kind of alternate reality. The novel describes the harsh realities of racism and life on the road. They are out of touch with the realities of modern warfare. We were faced with the awful reality of having nowhere to live. a book that captures the reality of life during wartime the harsh economic realities of life as a student the practical realities of running a children’s home the use of virtual reality in computer games She refuses to face reality. You’re out of touch with reality.Idioms  used to say that a situation is different from what has just been said or from what people believe Outwardly she seemed confident but in reality she felt extremely nervous. In reality, human beings and dinosaurs never lived on earth at the same time. see also virtual reality
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: reality