Definition of reckon verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    reckon

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈrekən//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrekən//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they reckon
    BrE BrE//ˈrekən//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrekən//
     
    he / she / it reckons
    BrE BrE//ˈrekənz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrekənz//
     
    past simple reckoned
    BrE BrE//ˈrekənd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrekənd//
     
    past participle reckoned
    BrE BrE//ˈrekənd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrekənd//
     
    -ing form reckoning
    BrE BrE//ˈrekənɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrekənɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] reckon (that)… (informal, especially British English) to think something or have an opinion about something I reckon (that) I’m going to get that job. He'll be famous one day. What do you reckon (= do you agree)? It's worth a lot of money, I reckon. ‘They'll never find out.’ ‘You reckon?(= I think you may be wrong about that) Synonymsthinkbelieve feel reckon be under the impressionThese words all mean to have an idea that something is true or possible or to have a particular opinion about somebody/​something.think to have an idea that something is true or possible, although you are not completely certain; to have a particular opinion about somebody/​something:Do you think (that) they’ll come? Well, I like it. What do you think?believe to have an idea that something is true or possible, although you are not completely certain; to have a particular opinion about somebody/​something:Police believe (that) the man may be armed.think or believe?When you are expressing an idea that you have or that somebody has of what is true or possible, believe is more formal than think. It is used especially for talking about ideas that other people have; think is used more often for talking about your own ideas:Police believe… I think… When you are expressing an opinion, believe is stronger than think and is used especially for matters of principle; think is used more for practical matters or matters of personal taste.feel to have a particular opinion about something that has happened or about what you/​somebody ought to do:We all felt (that) we were unlucky to lose.reckon (informal) to think that something is true or possible:I reckon (that) I’m going to get that job.be under the impression that… to have an idea that something is true:I was under the impression that the work had already been completed.Patterns to think/​believe/​feel/​reckon/​be under the impression that… It is thought/​believed/​reckoned that… to be thought/​believed/​felt/​reckoned to be something to think/​believe/​feel something about somebody/​something to sincerely/​honestly/​seriously/​mistakenly think/​believe/​feel
  2. 2  be reckoned [transitive] (not used in the progressive tenses) to be generally considered to be something reckon to be/have something Children are reckoned to be more sophisticated nowadays. + noun/adj. It was generally reckoned a success.
  3. 3[transitive] reckon to do something (British English, informal) to expect to do something We reckon to finish by ten. He wasn’t reckoning to pay so much.
  4. 4[transitive] to calculate an amount, a number, etc. reckon something (at something) I could see him reckoning the cost as I spoke. The age of the earth is reckoned at about 4 600 million years. reckon (that)… They reckon (that) their profits are down by at least 20%. be reckoned to do something The journey was reckoned to take about two hours.
  5. Word Origin Old English (ge)recenian ‘recount, relate’, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch rekenen and German rechnen ‘to count (up)’. Early senses included ‘give an account of items received’ and ‘mention things in order’, which gave rise to the notion of “calculation” and hence of “being of an opinion”.Extra examples They were already a political force to be reckoned with. We have to reckon with an element of chance. ‘They’ll never find out.’ ‘ You reckon?’ He’ll be famous one day. What do you reckon? I reckon (that) I’m going to get that job. It is generally reckoned that about half of all job vacancies are never advertised publicly. It’s worth a lot of money, I reckon. My debts were reckoned at $12 000. The age of the earth is reckoned to be about 4 600 million years. The trip was reckoned to take over two days. They reckon (that) their profits were down by 30%.Idioms
      a name to conjure with(British English)
       
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    1. 1(North American English a name to reckon with) a person or thing that is well known and respected in a particular field Miyazaki is still a name to conjure with among anime fans.
    2. 2(humorous) used when you mention a name that you think is difficult to remember or pronounce He comes from Tighnabruaich—now there's a name to conjure with!
    Phrasal Verbsreckon on somethingreckon somethingupreckon with somebodyreckon without somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: reckon