English

Definition of reflect verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    reflect

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//rɪˈflekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈflekt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they reflect
    BrE BrE//rɪˈflekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈflekt//
     
    he / she / it reflects
    BrE BrE//rɪˈflekts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈflekts//
     
    past simple reflected
    BrE BrE//rɪˈflektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈflektɪd//
     
    past participle reflected
    BrE BrE//rɪˈflektɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈflektɪd//
     
    -ing form reflecting
    BrE BrE//rɪˈflektɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈflektɪŋ//
     
    Energy and physical forces
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, usually passive] reflect somebody/something (in something) to show the image of somebody/something on the surface of something such as a mirror, water or glass His face was reflected in the mirror. She could see herself reflected in his eyes.
  2. 2  [transitive] reflect something to throw back light, heat, sound, etc. from a surface The windows reflected the bright afternoon sunlight. When the sun's rays hit the earth, a lot of the heat is reflected back into space. This material absorbs the sound, and doesn’t reflect it. See related entries: Energy and physical forces
  3. 3  [transitive] reflect something to show or be a sign of the nature of something or of somebody’s attitude or feeling Our newspaper aims to reflect the views of the local community. His music reflects his interest in African culture.
  4. 4  [intransitive, transitive] to think carefully and deeply about something Before I decide, I need time to reflect. reflect on/upon something She was left to reflect on the implications of her decision. reflect that… On the way home he reflected that the interview had gone well. reflect how, what, etc… She reflected how different it could have been. + speech ‘It could all have been so different,’ she reflected.
  5. Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French reflecter or Latin reflectere, from re- ‘back’ + flectere ‘to bend’.Extra examples He reflected ruefully that the his money didn’t buy as much as it used to He was left to reflect on the implications of his decision. I need time to reflect. In Milton’s poem, Satan, even after his fall, dimly reflects his former glory. Light reflects directly off a face of a crystal. One good thing, he reflected wryly, was that none of his colleagues would find out. Senegalese culture strongly reflects influences from Islamic rulers. She paused to reflect on what she had achieved. The condition of the house is reflected in its low price. The exhibition is designed to reflect the diversity of the nation and its regions. The punishment should adequately reflect the revulsion felt by most people for this appalling crime. The screen reflects light from the sun. The sun reflected dully off the stone walls. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect those of the editor. This kind of conduct reflects very poorly on you. This year’s budget simply reflects the fact that we have fewer people out of work. an opportune time to reflect critically on the city’s past information that may reflect negatively on research participants Her face reflected the power of her feelings. I paused to reflect how I would answer that question.Idioms
    reflect well, badly, etc. on somebody/something
     
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    to make somebody/something appear to be good, bad, etc. to other people This incident reflects badly on everyone involved.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: reflect