English

Definition of rent verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    rent

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//rent//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rent//
     
    see also rendVerb Forms present simple I / you / we / they rent
    BrE BrE//rent//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rent//
     
    he / she / it rents
    BrE BrE//rents//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rents//
     
    ; BrE BrE//rents//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rents//
     
    past simple rented
    BrE BrE//ˈrentɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrentɪd//
     
    ; BrE BrE//ˈrentɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrentɪd//
     
    past participle rented
    BrE BrE//ˈrentɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrentɪd//
     
    ; BrE BrE//ˈrentɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrentɪd//
     
    -ing form renting
    BrE BrE//ˈrentɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrentɪŋ//
     
    ; BrE BrE//ˈrentɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrentɪŋ//
     
    Renting a home
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] to regularly pay money to somebody so that you can use something that they own, such as a house, some land, a machine, etc. rent (something) to live in rented accommodation/housing/property In the long run, it works out more expensive to rent a television than to buy one. rent something from somebody Who do you rent the land from? See related entries: Renting a home
  2. 2  [transitive] to allow somebody to use something that you own such as a house or some land in exchange for regular payments rent something (out) (to somebody) He rents rooms in his house to students. The land is rented out to other farmers. She agreed to rent the room to me. rent somebody something She agreed to rent me the room.
  3. 3  [transitive] rent something (especially North American English) to pay money to somebody so that you can use something for a short period of time We rented a car for the week and explored the area. Shall we rent a movie this evening? compare hire
  4. 4[intransitive] (North American English) to be available for somebody to use if they pay a particular amount of money The apartment rents for $500 a month.
  5. Word Originverb Middle English: from Old French rente, from a root shared by render.Extra examples They agreed to rent the land to me. We rented a cottage from an agency. We rented our house out for a year when we went abroad. privately rented accommodation He had a list of movies they had rented from the local video store. She rented a car at the airport. They rented a meeting room in a downtown hotel. You can rent mountain bikes and explore the area.
British/​Americanrent / hire / letVerbs You can hire something for a short period of time , (British English only)) but rent something for a longer period:We can hire bikes for a day to explore the town. We don’t own our TV, we rent it. In North American English, rent is always used. It is sometimes now used in British English instead of hire, too. The owners of a thing can hire it out for a short period:(British English) Do you hire out bikes? Or they can rent (out)/let (out) a building, etc:We rent out rooms in our house to students. Outside a building you could see:(British English) To let (especially North American English) For rent. To hire can also mean to employ somebody, especially in North American English:We hired a new secretary. see also leaseNouns The amount of money that you pay to rent something is rent or rental (more formal). When you hire something you pay a hire charge (British English). On a sign outside a shop you might see:(British English) Bikes for hire. see also let, lease, hire
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: rent