Definition of rescue verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

rescue

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈreskjuː//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈreskjuː//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they rescue
BrE BrE//ˈreskjuː//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈreskjuː//
 
he / she / it rescues
BrE BrE//ˈreskjuːz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈreskjuːz//
 
past simple rescued
BrE BrE//ˈreskjuːd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈreskjuːd//
 
past participle rescued
BrE BrE//ˈreskjuːd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈreskjuːd//
 
-ing form rescuing
BrE BrE//ˈreskjuːɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈreskjuːɪŋ//
 
Terrorism
 
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 to save somebody/something from a dangerous or harmful situation rescue somebody/something from something/somebody He rescued a child from drowning. The house was rescued from demolition. You rescued me from an embarrassing situation. The bank rescued the company from bankruptcy. rescue somebody/something They were eventually rescued by helicopter. rescue somebody/something + adj. She had despaired of ever being rescued alive. Synonymssaverescue bail out redeemThese words all mean to prevent somebody/​something from dying, losing something, being harmed or embarrassed.save to prevent somebody/​something from dying, being harmed or destroyed or losing something:Doctors were unable to save him. a campaign to save the panda from extinctionrescue to save somebody/​something from a dangerous or harmful situation:They were rescued by a passing cruise ship.bail somebody out to rescue somebody/​something from a difficult situation, especially by providing money:Don’t expect me to bail you out if it all goes wrong.redeem (formal, religion) to save somebody from the power of evil:He was a sinner, redeemed by the grace of God. Redeem is also used in non-religious language in the phrase redeem a situation, which means to prevent a situation from being as bad as it might be.Patterns to save/​rescue/​redeem somebody/​something from something to save/​rescue/​redeem a situation to save/​redeem sinners/​mankind to rescue somebody/​bail somebody out financially See related entries: Terrorism Word Origin Middle English: from Old French rescoure from Latin re- (expressing intensive force) + excutere ‘shake out, discard’.Extra examples He died while trying to rescue his children from the blaze. Police officers helped to rescue motorists stranded by the floods. The little boy had to be rescued by firemen. He was drowned in an attempt to rescue the child. The pony had been rescued from near starvation by a kindly old lady. They were rescued by a passing cruise ship. You rescued me from a very embarrassing situation.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: rescue