Definition of rival verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

rival

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈraɪvl//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraɪvl//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they rival
BrE BrE//ˈraɪvl//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraɪvl//
 
he / she / it rivals
BrE BrE//ˈraɪvlz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraɪvlz//
 
past simple rivalled
BrE BrE//ˈraɪvld//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraɪvld//
 
past participle rivalled
BrE BrE//ˈraɪvld//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraɪvld//
 
(North American English also) past simple rivaled
BrE BrE//ˈraɪvld//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraɪvld//
 
(North American English also) past participle rivaled
BrE BrE//ˈraɪvld//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraɪvld//
 
-ing form rivalling
BrE BrE//ˈraɪvlɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraɪvlɪŋ//
 
(North American English also) -ing form rivaling
BrE BrE//ˈraɪvlɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraɪvlɪŋ//
 
 
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(rivalling, rivalled, (North American English also)rivaling, rivaled) rival somebody/something (for/in something) to be as good, impressive, etc. as somebody/something else synonym compare You will find scenery to rival anything you can see in the Alps. Golf cannot rival football for excitement. see also unrivalled Word Origin late 16th cent.: from Latin rivalis, originally in the sense ‘person using the same stream as another’, from rivus ‘stream’.Extra examples Nothing rivals skiing for sheer excitement. The food of this region is rivalled only by its wines. a palace which almost rivals Versailles in size Many mammals use echoes but the only ones to rival bats in sophistication are whales. The boat has an extensive galley which rivals most domestic kitchens. The collection is rivalled only by that at the British Museum.

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