English

Definition of rumour noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

rumour

 noun
(especially US English rumor) noun
BrE BrE//ˈruːmə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈruːmər//
 
 
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 [countable, uncountable] a piece of information, or a story, that people talk about, but that may not be true to start/spread a rumour rumour (of something) There are widespread rumours of job losses. rumour (about something) Some malicious rumours are circulating about his past. rumour (that…) I heard a rumour that they are getting married. Many of the stories are based on rumour. Rumour has it (= people say) that he was murdered. I thought she was leaving the company, but perhaps it may be just a rumour. Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French rumur, from Latin rumor ‘noise’.Extra examples His lengthy absence from work fuelled rumours that he might have been sacked. His lengthy absence will fuel rumours that he has been fired. Rumour has it that he was sacked from his last job. Rumours about an impending divorce were rife. The Chief Executive issued a statement to quash rumours of financial problems. The Washington rumour mill suggests the money changed hands illegally. The actor confirmed rumours that he will be leaving the series. The manager resigned suddenly amidst rumours of misconduct. The rumour quickly swept the town. There is no truth in the rumour that she is about to resign. There were persistent rumours of drug taking among staff. rumours surrounding the closure of the hospital Rumour has it that he was murdered.

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