English

Definition of scoff verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    scoff

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//skɒf//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//skɔːf//
     
    , NAmE//skɑːf//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they scoff
    BrE BrE//skɒf//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//skɔːf//
     
    , NAmE//skɑːf//
     
    he / she / it scoffs
    BrE BrE//skɒfs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//skɔːfs//
     
    , NAmE//skɑːfs//
     
    past simple scoffed
    BrE BrE//skɒft//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//skɔːft//
     
    , NAmE//skɑːft//
     
    past participle scoffed
    BrE BrE//skɒft//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//skɔːft//
     
    , NAmE//skɑːft//
     
    -ing form scoffing
    BrE BrE//ˈskɒfɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈskɔːfɪŋ//
     
    , NAmE//ˈskɑːfɪŋ//
     
    Hunger
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] scoff (at somebody/something) | + speech to talk about somebody/something in a way that makes it clear that you think they are stupid or ridiculous synonym mock He scoffed at our amateurish attempts. Don't scoff—she's absolutely right.
  2. 2(British English) (North American English scarf) [transitive] scoff (something) (informal) to eat a lot of something quickly Who scoffed all the grapes? See related entries: Hunger
  3. Word Origin sense 1 Middle English (first used as a noun in the sense ‘mockery, scorn’): perhaps of Scandinavian origin. sense 2 late 18th cent. (as a verb): originally a variant of Scots and dialect scaff. The noun is from Afrikaans schoff, representing Dutch schoft ‘quarter of a day’, (by extension) ‘meal’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: scoff

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