English

Definition of scotch verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

scotch

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//skɒtʃ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//skɑːtʃ//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they scotch
BrE BrE//skɒtʃ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//skɑːtʃ//
 
he / she / it scotches
BrE BrE//ˈskɒtʃɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈskɑːtʃɪz//
 
past simple scotched
BrE BrE//skɒtʃt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//skɑːtʃt//
 
past participle scotched
BrE BrE//skɒtʃt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//skɑːtʃt//
 
-ing form scotching
BrE BrE//ˈskɒtʃɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈskɑːtʃɪŋ//
 
 
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scotch something to stop something from happening; to take action to end something Plans for a merger have been scotched. Rumours that he had fled the country were promptly scotched by his wife. Word Origin early 17th cent. (as a noun): of unknown origin; perhaps related to the verbskate. The sense ‘render temporarily harmless’ is based on an emendation of Shakespeare's Macbeth iii. ii. 13 as “We have scotch'd the snake, not kill'd it”, originally understood as a use of scotch ‘to cut or score skin’; the sense ‘put an end to’ (early 19th cent.) results from the influence on this of the notion of wedging or blocking something so as to render it inoperative.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: scotch