Definition of sea noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    sea

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//siː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//siː//
     
    Coastlines and the sea, Travelling by boat or ship
     
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  1. 1  (also the sea) [uncountable] (literary seas [plural]) (especially British English) the salt water that covers most of the earth’s surface and surrounds its continents and islands to travel by sea a cottage by the sea The waste was dumped in the sea. The wreck is lying at the bottom of the sea. We left port and headed for the open sea (= far away from land). the cold seas of the Arctic a sea voyage a hotel room with sea view British/​Americansea / ocean In British English, the usual word for the mass of salt water that covers most of the earth’s surface is the sea. In North American English, the usual word is the ocean:A swimmer drowned in the sea/​ocean this morning. The names of particular areas of seas, however, are fixed:the Mediterranean Sea the Atlantic Ocean. Sea/​ocean are also used if you go to the coast on holiday/​vacation:We’re spending a week by the sea/​at the ocean in June. In North American English it is also common to say:We’re going to the beach for vacation. note at coast see also high seas, ocean Wordfinderbeach, coast, harbour, pier, sandbank, sea, shoreline, surf, tide, wave Wordfinderbeach, cliff, coast, dune, headland, inlet, promontory, sea, shore, tide See related entries: Coastlines and the sea, Travelling by boat or ship
  2. 2  [countable] (often Sea, especially as part of a name) a large area of salt water that is part of an ocean or surrounded by land the North Sea the Caspian Sea See related entries: Coastlines and the sea
  3. 3  [countable] (also seas [plural]) the movement of the waves of the sea It was a calm sea. The sea was very rough. See related entries: Coastlines and the sea
  4. 4[singular] sea of something a large amount of something that stretches over a wide area He looked down at the sea of smiling faces before him. See related entries: Coastlines and the sea
  5. Word Origin Old English sǣ, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zee and German See.Extra examples He has sailed the seven seas. I love swimming in the sea! In recent years the sea has risen by a couple of inches. She scanned the vast sea of faces below her. She stood on the cliff, staring out to sea. The camp is situated 6 755 feet above sea level. The fishing boats headed for the open sea. The island is sinking into the ocean due to rising sea levels. The sea has receded since the river was diverted. The sea was too rough for sailing in small boats. The ship put to sea in deteriorating weather conditions. They live by the sea. They were lost at sea when their ship sank en route for Madeira. They were surrounded by a sea of boxes. Thousands of Haitians tried to cross the sea to Florida. We crossed the Mediterranean Sea on a cruise ship. We sailed across the Black Sea in a yacht. We sent our furniture by sea. We spent three weeks at sea. We’ll go down to the sea for a swim before dinner. a calm sea after the storm a house overlooking the sea the rise of British sea power in the 17th and 18th centuries three ships sailing on the sea treacherous sea conditions around Greenland A boy drowned last night after being swept into rough seas by a large wave. Fish stocks in the North Sea are in danger of ‘crashing’ because of over-fishing. Her husband was in the navy and spent a lot of time away at sea. I asked for a room with a sea view. I looked down at the sea of faces. Now the wreck is lying at the bottom of the sea. Our next guest has travelled across land and sea to be with us this evening. The goods were sent by sea. The plane passed over a sea of greenery. The sea was very calm. The taxi made its way through a sea of bicycles. The waste is dumped in the sea. They live in a cottage by the sea. They sailed the seven seas in search of adventure. We left the port and headed for the open sea. the cold seas of the AntarcticIdioms
    1. 1  on the sea, especially in a ship, or in the sea It happened on the second night at sea. They were lost at sea. See related entries: Coastlines and the sea
    2. 2confused and not knowing what to do I'm all at sea with these new regulations. See related entries: Coastlines and the sea
    between the devil and the deep blue sea
     
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    in a difficult situation where there are two equally unpleasant or unacceptable choices
    to become a sailor See related entries: Coastlines and the sea far away from land where the sea is deepest She fell overboard and was swept out to sea. See related entries: Coastlines and the sea to leave a port or harbour by ship or boat See related entries: Coastlines and the sea
    there are plenty more fish in the sea
     
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    there are many other people or things that are as good as the one somebody has failed to get
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: sea