Definition of sense verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    sense

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//sens//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sens//
     
    (not used in the progressive tenses)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they sense
    BrE BrE//sens//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sens//
     
    he / she / it senses
    BrE BrE//ˈsensɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsensɪz//
     
    past simple sensed
    BrE BrE//senst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//senst//
     
    past participle sensed
    BrE BrE//senst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//senst//
     
    past simple sensing
    BrE BrE//ˈsensɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsensɪŋ//
     
    past participle sensing
    BrE BrE//ˈsensɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsensɪŋ//
     
     
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    become aware
  1. 1to become aware of something even though you cannot see it, hear it, etc. sense something Sensing danger, they started to run. I sensed a note of tension in his voice. sense (that)… Lisa sensed that he did not believe her. Thomas, she sensed, could convince anyone of anything. sense somebody/something doing something He sensed someone moving around behind him. sense somebody/something do something He sensed something move in the bushes. sense how, what, etc… She could sense how nervous he was.
  2. of machine
  3. 2sense something to discover and record something equipment that senses the presence of toxic gases
  4. Word Origin late Middle English (as a noun in the sense ‘meaning’): from Latin sensus ‘faculty of feeling, thought, meaning’, from sentire ‘feel’. The verb dates from the mid 16th cent.Extra examples He clearly sensed that some points could be scored. I immediately sensed something was wrong. I sensed quite strongly that she was angry with me. Maybe she could just sense what I needed. Sandra could almost sense the tension in the air. She apparently sensed defeat was inevitable. She sensed the terrible pain he was feeling.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: sense