English

Definition of sign verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    sign

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//saɪn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//saɪn//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they sign
    BrE BrE//saɪn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//saɪn//
     
    he / she / it signs
    BrE BrE//saɪnz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//saɪnz//
     
    past simple signed
    BrE BrE//saɪnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//saɪnd//
     
    past participle signed
    BrE BrE//saɪnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//saɪnd//
     
    -ing form signing
    BrE BrE//ˈsaɪnɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsaɪnɪŋ//
     
    Legal documents
     
    jump to other results
    your name
  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to write your name on a document, letter, etc. to show that you have written it, that you agree with what it says, or that it is genuine Sign here, please. sign something Sign your name here, please. You haven't signed the letter. to sign a cheque The treaty was signed on 24 March. The player was signing autographs for a group of fans. sign yourself + noun He signed himself ‘Jimmy’. See related entries: Legal documents
  2. contract
  3. 2[transitive, intransitive] to arrange for somebody, for example a sports player or musician, to sign a contract agreeing to work for your company; to sign a contract agreeing to work for a company sign somebody United have just signed a new goalie. sign for something He signed for United yesterday. sign with something The band signed with Virgin Records.
  4. make movement/sound
  5. 3[intransitive, transitive] sign (to/for somebody) (to do something) | sign that… to make a request or tell somebody to do something by using a sign, especially a hand movement synonym signal The hotel manager signed to the porter to pick up my case. The police officer signed for us to stop.
  6. for deaf person
  7. 4[intransitive, transitive] to use sign language to communicate with somebody She learnt to sign to help her deaf child. sign something An increasing number of plays are now being signed.
  8. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French signe (noun), signer (verb), from Latin signum ‘mark, token’.Extra examples One copy of this letter should be duly signed and returned to us. The courier asked me to sign for the parcel. This is the contract you will be required to sign. You can sign up online for language classes. a first edition of the book, personally signed by the author He signed his troops to move out. He signed with the San Francisco 49ers. The manager signed to the porter to pick up my case. The team has just signed a new goalkeeper. You haven’t signed the letter.Idioms
    signed and sealed, signed, sealed and delivered
     
    jump to other results
    definite, because all the legal documents have been signed More Like This Alliteration in idioms belt and braces, black and blue, born and bred, chalk and cheese, chop and change, done and dusted, down and dirty, in dribs and drabs, eat somebody out of house and home, facts and figures, fast and furious, first and foremost, forgive and forget, hale and hearty, hem and haw, kith and kin, mix and match, part and parcel, puff and pant, to rack and ruin, rant and rave, risk life and limb, short and sweet, signed and sealed, spic and span, through thick and thin, this and that, top and tail, tried and tested, wax and waneSee worksheet.
    sign on the dotted line
     
    jump to other results
    (informal) to sign a document to show that you have agreed to buy something or do something Just sign on the dotted line and the car is yours.
    (old-fashioned) to make a promise never to drink alcohol
    Phrasal Verbssign somethingawaysign for somethingsign insign offsign somethingoffsign off on somethingsign onsign onsign somethingover (to somebody)sign up (for something)sign up to something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: sign