Definition of slow verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

slow

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//sləʊ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//sloʊ//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they slow
BrE BrE//sləʊ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//sloʊ//
 
he / she / it slows
BrE BrE//sləʊz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//sloʊz//
 
past simple slowed
BrE BrE//sləʊd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//sloʊd//
 
past participle slowed
BrE BrE//sləʊd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//sloʊd//
 
-ing form slowing
BrE BrE//ˈsləʊɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈsloʊɪŋ//
 
Driving
 
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[intransitive, transitive] to go or to make something/somebody go at a slower speed or be less active Economic growth has slowed a little. The bus slowed to a halt. slow down/up The car slowed down as it approached the junction. The game slowed up little in the second half. You must slow down (= work less hard) or you'll make yourself ill. slow something/somebody down/up The ice on the roads was slowing us down. slow something/somebody We hope to slow the spread of the disease. see also slowdown See related entries: Driving Word Origin Old English slāw ‘slow-witted, sluggish’, of Germanic origin.Extra examples Bill slowed his pace to allow her to catch up with him. Economic growth is expected to slow. I was nearing West Road when the traffic slowed to a crawl. Rachel tried to slow her breathing. Sales have slowed down quite markedly. She very deliberately slowed her steps. Slow down a little! The flow of people into the building slowed to a trickle. The roadblocks hardly slowed them at all. The two of them had slowed almost to a stop. Time seemed to slow down as she fell.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: slow