Definition of snatch verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    snatch

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//snætʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//snætʃ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they snatch
    BrE BrE//snætʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//snætʃ//
     
    he / she / it snatches
    BrE BrE//ˈsnætʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsnætʃɪz//
     
    past simple snatched
    BrE BrE//snætʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//snætʃt//
     
    past participle snatched
    BrE BrE//snætʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//snætʃt//
     
    -ing form snatching
    BrE BrE//ˈsnætʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsnætʃɪŋ//
     
    Committing crime
     
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  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] to take something quickly and often rudely or roughly synonym grab snatch something (+ adv./prep.) She managed to snatch the gun from his hand. Gordon snatched up his jacket and left the room. (+ adv./prep.) Hey, you kids! Don't all snatch!
  2. 2[transitive] snatch somebody/something (from somebody/something) to take somebody/something away from a person or place, especially by force; to steal something synonym steal The raiders snatched $100 from the cash register. The baby was snatched from its parents' car. See related entries: Committing crime
  3. 3[transitive] snatch something to take or get something quickly, especially because you do not have much time I managed to snatch an hour's sleep. The team snatched a dramatic victory in the last minute of the game.
  4. Word Origin Middle English sna(c)che (verb) ‘suddenly snap at’, (noun) ‘a snare’; perhaps related to snack.Extra examples He snatched at her arm as she walked past. I snatched it out of his hands. She almost snatched the letter from my hand. She leaped to her feet, snatching up her bag. She snatched her hand back. Someone tried to snatch her purse. He snatched at the steering wheel. The baby was snatched from its parents’ car. The raiders snatched $100 from the cash register.Idioms
    snatch victory from the jaws of defeat
     
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    to win something even though it seemed up until the last moment that you would lose The idiom is often reversed for humorous effect to show that a person or team were expected to win, but then lost at the last moment, snatching defeat from the jaws of victory.
    Phrasal Verbssnatch at something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: snatch