Definition of state verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    state

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//steɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//steɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they state
    BrE BrE//steɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//steɪt//
     
    he / she / it states
    BrE BrE//steɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//steɪts//
     
    past simple stated
    BrE BrE//ˈsteɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsteɪtɪd//
     
    past participle stated
    BrE BrE//ˈsteɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsteɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form stating
    BrE BrE//ˈsteɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsteɪtɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  to formally write or say something, especially in a careful and clear way state something He has already stated his intention to run for election. The facts are clearly stated in the report. There is no need to state the obvious (= to say something that everyone already knows). state how, what, etc… State clearly how many tickets you require. state that… He stated categorically that he knew nothing about the deal. it is stated that… It was stated that standards at the hospital were dropping. something is stated to be/have something The contract was stated to be invalid. Synonymsdeclarestate indicate announceThese words all mean to say something, usually firmly and clearly and often in public.declare (rather formal) to say something officially or publicly; to state something firmly and clearly:to declare war The painting was declared to be a forgery.state (rather formal) to formally write or say something, especially in a careful and clear way:He has already stated his intention to run for election.indicate (rather formal) to state something, sometimes in a way that is slightly indirect:During our meeting, he indicated his willingness to cooperate.announce to tell people officially about a decision or plans; to give information about something in a public place, especially through a loudspeaker; to say something in a loud and/​or serious way:They haven’t formally announced their engagement yet. Has our flight been announced yet?declare or announce? Declare is used more often for giving judgements; announce is used more often for giving facts:The painting was announced to be a forgery. They haven’t formally declared their engagement yet.Patterns to declare/​state/​indicate/​announce that… to declare/​state somebody/​something to be something to declare/​state/​indicate/​announce your intention to do something to declare/​state/​announce something formally/​publicly/​officially to declare/​state/​announce something firmly/​confidently
  2. 2[usually passive] state something to fix or announce the details of something, especially on a written document This is not one of their stated aims. You must arrive at the time stated. Do not exceed the stated dose (= of medicine).
  3. Word Origin Middle English (as a noun): partly a shortening of estate, partly from Latin status ‘manner of standing, condition’, from stare ‘to stand’. The current verb senses date from the mid 17th cent.Extra examples ‘Alcohol doesn’t solve problems,’ she stated flatly. All the photographs in this book, unless otherwise stated, date from the 1950s. As previously stated, the phrase ‘value for money’ has an ambiguous meaning. As previously stated, the phrase has an ambiguous meaning. At the risk of stating the obvious, people who have not paid cannot be admitted. He stated his own views quite openly. I am merely stating the facts. Let me state at the outset that this report contains little that is new. Let me state for the record that my knowledge of wine is almost non-existent. Please state clearly how many tickets you require. She stated categorically that she had no intention of leaving. The committee failed to state their reasons for this decision. The demands are more easily stated than met. The report goes on to state that… These facts were nowhere explicitly stated. We cannot accept this proposal for the reasons stated above. Do not exceed the stated dose. There is no need to state the obvious.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: state