English

Definition of stem verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

stem

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//stem//
 
; NAmE NAmE//stem//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they stem
BrE BrE//stem//
 
; NAmE NAmE//stem//
 
he / she / it stems
BrE BrE//stemz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//stemz//
 
past simple stemmed
BrE BrE//stemd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//stemd//
 
past participle stemmed
BrE BrE//stemd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//stemd//
 
-ing form stemming
BrE BrE//ˈstemɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈstemɪŋ//
 
 
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(stemming, stemmed) stem something to stop something that is flowing from spreading or increasing The cut was bandaged to stem the bleeding. They discussed ways of stemming the flow of smuggled drugs. The government had failed to stem the tide of factory closures. The reforms failed to stem social discontent. Word Origin

stem from something.

Old English stemn, stefn, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch stam and German Stamm. Sense (4) is related to Dutch steven, German Steven. verb Middle English (in the sense ‘to stop, delay’): from Old Norse stemma, of Germanic origin.
Phrasal Verbsstem from something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: stem