Definition of strategic adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    strategic

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//strəˈtiːdʒɪk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//strəˈtiːdʒɪk//
     
    (less frequent strategical
    BrE BrE//strəˈtiːdʒɪkl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//strəˈtiːdʒɪkl//
     
    )
    [usually before noun] Conflict
     
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  1. 1done as part of a plan that is meant to achieve a particular purpose or to gain an advantage strategic planning a strategic decision to sell off part of the business Cameras were set up at strategic points (= in places where they would be most effective) along the route.
  2. 2connected with getting an advantage in a war or other military situation Malta was of vital strategic importance during the war. a strategic alliance the strategic bombing of communication centres See related entries: Conflict
  3. 3(of weapons, especially nuclear weapons) intended to be fired at an enemy’s country rather than used in a battle strategic missiles compare tactical (3)
  4. Word Origin early 19th cent.: from French stratégique, from Greek stratēgikos, from stratēgos, from stratos ‘army’ + agein ‘to lead’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: strategic