Definition of stump verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    stump

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//stʌmp//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stʌmp//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they stump
    BrE BrE//stʌmp//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stʌmp//
     
    he / she / it stumps
    BrE BrE//stʌmps//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stʌmps//
     
    past simple stumped
    BrE BrE//stʌmpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stʌmpt//
     
    past participle stumped
    BrE BrE//stʌmpt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stʌmpt//
     
    -ing form stumping
    BrE BrE//ˈstʌmpɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈstʌmpɪŋ//
     
    Cricket
     
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  1. 1[transitive, usually passive] stump somebody (informal) to ask somebody a question that is too difficult for them to answer or give them a problem that they cannot solve synonym baffle I'm stumped. I don't know how they got here before us. Farmers are aware of the problem but are stumped by what to do about it. Kate was stumped for words (= unable to answer).
  2. 2[intransitive] + adv./prep. to walk in a noisy, heavy way, especially because you are angry or upset synonym stomp He stumped off, muttering under his breath.
  3. 3[intransitive, transitive] + adv./prep. | stump something (North American English) to travel around making political speeches, especially before an election He stumped around the country trying to build up support.
  4. 4[transitive] stump somebody (in cricket) (of a wicketkeeper ) to put a batsman out of the game by knocking off either of the bails (= the two pieces of wood that bridge the stumps ) with the ball, when he or she is out of the area in which the ball can be hit, but not running See related entries: Cricket
  5. Word Origin Middle English (denoting a part of a limb remaining after an amputation): from Middle Low German stump(e) or Middle Dutch stomp. The early sense of the verb was ‘stumble’.Extra examples At first I was stumped by the question. His condition has stumped experts throughout Europe and the US. I’m stumped. I don’t know how they got here before us. Phrasal Verbsstump up (for something)
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: stump