English

Definition of subject verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

subject

 verb
verbVerb Forms present simple I / you / we / they subject
BrE BrE//səbˈdʒekt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//səbˈdʒekt//
 
he / she / it subjects
BrE BrE//səbˈdʒekts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//səbˈdʒekts//
 
past simple subjected
BrE BrE//səbˈdʒektɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//səbˈdʒektɪd//
 
past participle subjected
BrE BrE//səbˈdʒektɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//səbˈdʒektɪd//
 
-ing form subjecting
BrE BrE//səbˈdʒektɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//səbˈdʒektɪŋ//
 
 
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BrE BrE//səbˈdʒekt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//səbˈdʒekt//
 
subject something (to something) (formal) to bring a country or group of people under your control, especially by using force The Roman Empire subjected most of Europe to its rule.
Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘(person) owing obedience’): from Old French suget, from Latin subjectus ‘brought under’, past participle of subicere, from sub- ‘under’ + jacere ‘throw’. Senses relating to philosophy, logic, and grammar are derived ultimately from Aristotle's use of to hupokeimenon meaning ‘material from which things are made’ and ‘subject of attributes and predicates’. Phrasal Verbssubject somebody to something
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: subject