English

Definition of survey verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    survey

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//səˈveɪ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sərˈveɪ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they survey
    BrE BrE//səˈveɪ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sərˈveɪ//
     
    he / she / it surveys
    BrE BrE//səˈveɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sərˈveɪz//
     
    past simple surveyed
    BrE BrE//səˈveɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sərˈveɪd//
     
    past participle surveyed
    BrE BrE//səˈveɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sərˈveɪd//
     
    -ing form surveying
    BrE BrE//səˈveɪɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sərˈveɪɪŋ//
     
    Buying a home
     
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  1. 1  survey something to look carefully at the whole of something, especially in order to get a general impression of it synonym inspect The next morning we surveyed the damage caused by the fire. He surveyed himself in the mirror before going out. She opened her eyes and surveyed her surroundings.
  2. 2survey something to study and give a general description of something This chapter briefly surveys the current state of European politics.
  3. 3survey something to measure and record the features of an area of land, for example in order to make a map or in preparation for building
  4. 4survey something (British English) to examine a building to make sure it is in good condition Have the house surveyed before you decide whether to buy it. See related entries: Buying a home
  5. 5  survey somebody/something to investigate the opinions or behaviour of a group of people by asking them a series of questions synonym interview We surveyed 500 smokers and found that over three quarters would like to give up. 87% of the 1 000 companies surveyed employ part-time staff. More Like This Pronunciation changes by part of speech abuse, alternate, advocate, approximate, contract, converse, convict, decrease, delegate, discount, duplicate, estimate, export, extract, graduate, import, intimate, moderate, object, permit, present, protest, record, refund, refuse, subject, suspect, survey, torment, upgradeSee worksheet.
  6. Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘examine and ascertain the condition of’): from Anglo-Norman French surveier, from medieval Latin supervidere, from super- ‘over’ + videre ‘to see’. The early sense of the noun (late 15th cent.) was ‘supervision’.Extra examples Her green eyes surveyed him coolly. I surveyed the scene from my window. She surveyed his appearance critically. 87% of the companies surveyed employ part-time staff. The aim of the project is to survey public attitudes to disability.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: survey