Definition of take verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    take

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//teɪk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//teɪk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they take
    BrE BrE//teɪk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//teɪk//
     
    he / she / it takes
    BrE BrE//teɪks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//teɪks//
     
    past simple took
    BrE BrE//tʊk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tʊk//
     
    past participle taken
    BrE BrE//ˈteɪkən//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈteɪkən//
     
    -ing form taking
    BrE BrE//ˈteɪkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈteɪkɪŋ//
     
    Exams and assessment, Teaching and learning, Train and bus travel
     
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    carry/lead
  1. 1  [transitive] to carry or move something from one place to another take something (with you) I forgot to take my bag with me when I got off the bus. take something to somebody/something Take this to the bank for me, would you? Shall I take a gift to my host family? take somebody something Shall I take my host family a gift?
  2. 2  [transitive] to go with somebody from one place to another, especially to guide or lead them take somebody It's too far to walk—I'll take you by car. take somebody to something A boy took us to our room. take somebody doing something I'm taking the kids swimming later. take somebody to do something The boys were taken to see their grandparents most weekends. Synonymstakelead escort drive show walk guide usher directThese words all mean to go with somebody from one place to another.take to go with somebody from one place to another, for example in order to show them something or to show them the way to a place:It’s too far to walk—I’ll take you by car.lead to go with or go in front of somebody in order to show them the way or to make them go in the right direction:Firefighters led the survivors to safety.escort to go with somebody in order to protect or guard them or to show them the way:The president arrived, escorted by twelve bodyguards.drive to take somebody somewhere in a car, taxi, etc:My mother drove us to the airport.show to take somebody to a particular place, in the right direction, or along the correct route:The attendant showed us to our seats.walk to go somewhere with somebody on foot, especially in order to make sure that they get there safely; to take an animal, especially a dog, for a walk or make an animal walk somewhere:He always walked her home. Have you walked the dog yet today?guide to show somebody the way to a place, often by going with them; to show somebody a place that you know well:She guided us through the busy streets. We were guided around the museums.usher (rather formal) to politely take or show somebody where they should go, especially within a building:She ushered her guests to their seats.direct (rather formal) to tell or show somebody how to get somewhere or where to go:A young woman directed them to the station.Patterns to take/lead/escort/drive/show/walk/guide/usher/direct somebody to/out of/into something to take/lead/escort/drive/show/walk/guide somebody around/round to take/lead/escort/drive/walk somebody home to take/lead/escort/guide somebody to safety to lead/show the way
  3. 3  [transitive] take somebody/something + adv./prep. to make somebody/something go from one level, situation, etc. to another Her energy and talent took her to the top of her profession. The new loan takes the total debt to $100 000. I'd like to take my argument a stage further. He believes he has the skills to take the club forward. We'll take the matter forward at our next meeting (= discuss it further).
  4. reach and hold
  5. 4  [transitive] take somebody/something to put your hands or arms around somebody/something and hold them/it; to reach for somebody/something and hold them/it I passed him the rope and he took it. Free newspapers: please take one. Can you take (= hold) the baby for a moment? He took her hand/took her by the hand (= held her hand, for example to lead her somewhere). She took the child in her arms and kissed him.
  6. remove
  7. 5  [transitive] take something/somebody + adv./prep. to remove something/somebody from a place or a person Will you take your books off the table? The sign must be taken down. He took some keys out of his pocket. My name had been taken off the list. She was playing with a knife, so I took it away from her. (informal) She was playing with a knife, so I took it off her. (figurative) The new sports centre will take the pressure off the old one.
  8. 6  [transitive] take something to remove something without permission or by mistake Someone has taken my scarf. Did the burglars take anything valuable? (figurative) The storms took the lives of 50 people.
  9. 7  [transitive] to get something from a particular source take something from something The scientists are taking water samples from the river. The machine takes its name from its inventor. take something out of something Part of her article is taken straight (= copied) out of my book.
  10. capture
  11. 8  [transitive] to capture a place or person; to get control of something take something (from somebody) The rebels succeeded in taking the town. The state has taken control of the company. take somebody + noun The rebels took him prisoner. He was taken prisoner by the rebels.
  12. choose/buy
  13. 9  [transitive] take something to choose, buy or rent something I'll take the grey jacket. We took a room at the hotel for two nights.
  14. 10[transitive] take something (formal) to buy a newspaper or magazine regularly We take the ‘Express’.
  15. eat/drink
  16. 11  [transitive] take something to eat, drink, etc. something Do you take sugar in your coffee? The doctor has given me some medicine to take for my cough. He started taking drugs (= illegal drugs) at college.
  17. mathematics
  18. 12[transitive] take A (away) from B B take away A take A away (not used in the progressive tenses) to reduce one number by the value of another synonym subtract Take 5 from 12 and you're left with 7. (informal) 80 take away 5 is 75.
  19. write down
  20. 13  [transitive] take something to find out and record something; to write something down The police officer took my name and address. Did you take notes in the class?
  21. photograph
  22. 14  [transitive] take something to photograph somebody/something to take a photograph/picture/snapshot of somebody/something to have your picture/photo taken
  23. measurement
  24. 15  [transitive] take something to test or measure something to take somebody’s temperature I need to have my blood pressure taken.
  25. seat
  26. 16  [transitive] take something to sit down in or use a chair, etc. Are these seats taken? Come in; take a seat. Synonymssitsit down be seated take a seat perchThese words all mean to rest your weight on your bottom with your back upright, for example on a chair.sit to rest your weight on your bottom with your back upright, for example on a chair:May I sit here? Sit still, will you! Sit is usually used with an adverb or prepositional phrase to show where or how somebody sits, but sometimes another phrase or clause is used to show what somebody does while they are sitting:We sat talking for hours.sit down/sit yourself down to move from a standing position to a sitting position:Please sit down. Come in and sit yourselves down.be seated (formal) to be sitting:She was seated at the head of the table. Be seated is often used as a formal way of inviting somebody to sit down:Please be seated.take a seat to sit down Take a seat is used especially as a polite way of inviting somebody to sit down:Please take a seat.perch (rather informal) to sit on something, especially on the edge of something:She perched herself on the edge of the bed. Perch is always used with an adverb or prepositional phrase to show where somebody is perching.Patterns to sit/sit down/be seated/take a seat/perch on something to sit/sit down/be seated/take a seat in something
  27. give example
  28. 17[transitive] take somebody/something used to introduce somebody/something as an example Lots of couples have problems in the first year of marriage. Take Ann and Paul.
  29. accept/receive
  30. 18  [transitive] (not usually used in the progressive tenses or in the passive) take something to accept or receive something If they offer me the job, I'll take it. She was accused of taking bribes. Does the hotel take credit cards? I'll take the call in my office. Why should I take the blame for somebody else's mistakes? If you take my advice you'll have nothing more to do with him. Will you take $10 for the book (= will you sell it for $10)? The store took (= sold goods worth) $100 000 last week.
  31. 19  [transitive] (not usually used in the progressive tenses) take somebody to accept somebody as a customer, patient, etc. The school doesn't take boys (= only has girls). The dentist can't take any new patients.
  32. 20[transitive] (not usually used in the progressive tenses) take something to experience or be affected by something The school took the full force of the explosion. Can the ropes take the strain (= not break)? The team took a terrible beating.
  33. 21  [transitive, no passive] take something (not usually used in the progressive tenses) to be able to bear something She can't take criticism. I don't think I can take much more of this heat. I find his attitude a little hard to take.
  34. 22  [transitive] take something/somebody + adv./prep. to react to something/somebody in a particular way He took the criticism surprisingly well. These threats are not to be taken lightly. I wish you'd take me seriously. She took it in the spirit in which it was intended.
  35. consider
  36. 23  [transitive] (not used in the progressive tenses) to understand or consider something in a particular way take something (as something) She took what he said as a compliment. How am I supposed to take that remark? Taken overall, the project was a success. take something to do something What did you take his comments to mean?
  37. 24[transitive] (not used in the progressive tenses) to consider somebody/something to be somebody/something, especially when you are wrong take somebody/something for somebody/something Even the experts took the painting for a genuine Van Gogh. Of course I didn't do it! What do you take me for (= what sort of person do you think I am)? take somebody/something to be somebody/something I took the man with him to be his father.
  38. have feeling/opinion
  39. 25  [transitive] (not usually used in the progressive tenses) take something to have a particular feeling, opinion or attitude My parents always took an interest in my hobbies. Don't take offence (= be offended) at what I said. I took a dislike to him. He takes the view that children are responsible for their own actions.
  40. action
  41. 26  [transitive] take something to use a particular course of action in order to deal with or achieve something The government is taking action to combat drug abuse. We need to take a different approach to the problem.
  42. 27  [transitive] take something used with nouns to say that somebody is doing something, performing an action, etc. to take a step/walk/stroll to take a bath/shower/wash to take a look/glance to take a bite/drink/sip to take a deep breath to take a break/rest (British English) No decision will be taken on the matter until next week.
  43. form/position
  44. 28[transitive] take something to have a particular form, position or state Our next class will take the form of a debate. The new President takes office in January.
  45. time
  46. 29  [transitive, no passive, intransitive] to need or require a particular amount of time take something The journey to the airport takes about half an hour. take something to do something It takes about half an hour to get to the airport. That cut is taking a long time to heal. The official seemed to take hours to examine my passport. take somebody something (to do something) It took her three hours to repair her bike. It'll take her time to recover from the illness. take something for somebody to do something It'll take time (= take a long time) for her to recover from the illness. + adv. I need a shower—I won't take long. Which Word?last / takeLast and take are both used to talk about the length of time that something continues. Last is used to talk about the length of time that an event continues:How long do you think this storm will last? The movie lasted over two hours. Last does not always need an expression of time:His annoyance won’t last. Last is also used to say that you have enough of something:We don’t have enough money to last until next month. Take is used to talk about the amount of time you need in order to go somewhere or do something. It must be used with an expression of time:It takes (me) at least an hour to get home from work. How long will the flight take? The water took ages to boil.
  47. need
  48. 30[transitive, no passive] to need or require something in order to happen or be done take somebody/something to do something It only takes one careless driver to cause an accident. It doesn't take much to make her angry. take something (informal) He didn't take much persuading (= he was easily persuaded).
  49. 31[transitive, no passive] (not used in the progressive tenses) take something (of machines, etc.) to use something in order to work All new cars take unleaded petrol.
  50. size of shoes/clothes
  51. 32[transitive, no passive] (not used in the progressive tenses) take something to wear a particular size in shoes or clothes What size shoes do you take?
  52. hold/contain
  53. 33[transitive, no passive] (not used in the progressive tenses) take something/somebody to have enough space for something/somebody; to be able to hold or contain a particular quantity The bus can take 60 passengers. The tank takes 50 litres.
  54. teach/lead
  55. 34[transitive] take somebody (for something) take something to be the teacher or leader in a class or a religious service The head teacher usually takes us for French. Mr Perkins took the morning service. See related entries: Teaching and learning
  56. study
  57. 35[transitive] take something to study a subject at school, college, etc. She is planning to take a computer course. How many subjects are you taking this year? See related entries: Teaching and learning
  58. exam
  59. 36[transitive] take something to do an exam or a test When did you take your driving test? See related entries: Exams and assessment
  60. transport/road
  61. 37[transitive] take something to use a form of transport, a road, a path, etc. to go to a place to take the bus/plane/train to take a cab Take the second road on the right. It's more interesting to take the coast road. See related entries: Train and bus travel
  62. go over/around
  63. 38[transitive] take something (+ adv./prep.) to go over or around something The horse took the first fence well. He takes bends much too fast.
  64. in sports
  65. 39[transitive] take something (of a player in a sports game) to kick or throw the ball from a fixed or agreed position to take a penalty/free kick/corner
  66. vote/survey
  67. 40[transitive] take something to use a particular method to find out people’s opinions to take a vote/poll/survey
  68. be successful
  69. 41[intransitive] to be successful; to work The skin graft failed to take.
  70. grammar
  71. 42[transitive] (not used in the progressive tenses) take something (of verbs, nouns, etc.) to have or require something when used in a sentence or other structure The verb ‘rely’ takes the preposition ‘on’.
  72. More Like This Verbs with two objects bet, bring, build, buy, cost, get, give, leave, lend, make, offer, owe, pass, pay, play, post, promise, read, refuse, sell, send, show, sing, take, teach, tell, throw, wish, writeSee worksheet. Word Origin late Old English tacan ‘get (especially by force), capture’, from Old Norse taka ‘grasp, lay hold of’, of unknown ultimate origin.Extra examples Harry took his rejection philosophically. He took what I said as a criticism. I wanted to be taken seriously as an artist. She took the news of her father’s death very badly. They won’t take kindly to being ordered about. 28 take away 5 is 23. A military junta took control of the country. All she had taken was her passport and driving licence. Can you take the baby for a moment? England failed to take their chances and had to settle for a draw. Even the experts took the painting to be a genuine Van Gogh. He started taking drugs at college. He took her hand/took her by the hand. He took the bend much too fast. He’s not the fool you take him for. I asked them if they’d take me with them. I don’t think I can take much more of this heat. I find his attitude a little hard to take. I mistakenly took her for the Senator’s wife. I need a shower—I won’t take long. I wish you’d take me seriously. I’ll take the call in my office. I’ll take the grey jacket. I’m afraid your husband has taken a turn for the worse. I’m taking the kids swimming later. If they offer me the job, I’ll take it. If you choose deceit, then you must take the consequences of your actions. If you take my advice you’ll have nothing more to do with him. It takes about half an hour to get to the airport. It was clear that she wasn’t going to take any nonsense. It’ll take her time to recover from the illness. It’s too far to walk—I’ll take you by car. My things had already been taken to my room. Of course I didn’t do it! What do you take me for? Part of her article is taken straight out of my book. Please remember to take all your belongings with you when you leave the bus. She can’t take criticism. She took her bags along with her. She’s taken a nasty fall and has her leg in plaster. Should I take him a gift? Take 5 from 12 and you’re left with 7. Take the initiative and fill your life with exciting experiences. The bank robbers took several employees hostage. The boy took us to our rooms. The dentist can’t take any new patients. The horse took the jump safely but then stumbled. The school doesn’t take boys. The store took $100 000 last week. They took the night train to Vienna. They were taken to see their grandparents most weekends. Think about what you need to take for the trip. We took a bus south to Cairo. We took a ferry across to the island. When the bus stopped for fuel, we took the opportunity to get something to eat. Why should I take the blame for somebody else’s mistakes? Will you take $10 for the book? You fly to Brussels and take the train to Bruges. You should take her home soon. You’ll have to take a taxi. There’s no other way of getting there. take a cheque/credit card/£50 note take a job take a particular amount of money for somethingIdioms Most idioms containing take are at the entries for the nouns and adjectives in the idioms, for example take the biscuit is at biscuit. 
      somebody can take it or ˈleave it
       
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    1. 1used to say that you do not care if somebody accepts or rejects your offer
    2. 2used to say that somebody does not have a strong opinion about something Dancing? I can take it or leave it.
    have (got) what it ˈtakes
     
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    (informal) to have the qualities, ability, etc. needed to be successful
    I, you, etc. can’t take somebody ˈanywhere
     
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    (informal, often humorous) used to say that you cannot trust somebody to behave well in public You haven’t spilled your coffee again! I can’t take you anywhere!
    take something as it ˈcomes, take somebody as they ˈcome
     
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    to accept something/somebody without wishing it/them to be different or without thinking about it/them very much in advance She takes life as it comes.
    to suppose; to assume I take it you won't be coming to the party?
    take it from ˈme (that…)
     
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    (informal) used to emphasize that what you are going to say is the truth Take it from me—he'll be a millionaire before he's 30.
    take it/a lot ˈout of somebody
     
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    (informal) to make somebody physically or mentally tired Taking care of small children really takes it out of you.
    take it on/upon yourself to do something
     
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    to decide to do something without asking permission or advice
    take some/a lot of ˈdoing
     
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    (informal) to need a lot of effort or time; to be very difficult to do
    (informal) used as an exclamation when you are hitting somebody or attacking them in some other way
    Phrasal Verbsbe ˌtaken ˈup with somebodybe ˈtaken with somebodyˌtake somebody aˈbackˌtake ˈafter somebodyˌtake aˈgainst somebodyˌtake somethingaˈpartˌtake somethingaˈwayˌtake aˈway from somethingˌtake somethingˈbackˌtake somethingˈdownˌtake somethingˈinˌtake it ˈout on somebodyˌtake something ˈoff somethingˌtake ˈon somebodyˌtake somethingˈout (of something)ˌtake something ˈout of somethingˌtake somebody ˈout of herselfˌtake somethingˈoverˌtake somebody ˈthrough somethingˈtake to somebodyˌtake somethingˈupˌtake somebody ˈup on somethingˌtake something ˈup with somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: take