English

Definition of terrify verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

terrify

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈterɪfaɪ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈterɪfaɪ//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they terrify
BrE BrE//ˈterɪfaɪ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈterɪfaɪ//
 
he / she / it terrifies
BrE BrE//ˈterɪfaɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈterɪfaɪz//
 
past simple terrified
BrE BrE//ˈterɪfaɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈterɪfaɪd//
 
past participle terrified
BrE BrE//ˈterɪfaɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈterɪfaɪd//
 
-ing form terrifying
BrE BrE//ˈterɪfaɪɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈterɪfaɪɪŋ//
 
Fear
 
jump to other results
terrify somebody to make somebody feel extremely frightened Flying terrifies her. He terrified employees at the bank into handing over cash. Stop it! You’re terrifying the children! Synonymsfrightenscare alarm terrifyThese words all mean to make somebody afraid.frighten to make somebody feel afraid, often suddenly:He brought out a gun and frightened them off.scare to make somebody feel afraid:They managed to scare the bears away.alarm to make somebody anxious or afraid:It alarms me that nobody takes this problem seriously. Alarm is used when somebody has a feeling that something unpleasant or dangerous might happen in the future; the feeling is often more one of worry than actual fear.terrify to make somebody feel extremely afraid:Flying terrified her.frighten or scare?Scare is slightly more informal than frighten.Patterns to frighten/​scare somebody/​something away/​off to frighten/​scare/​terrify somebody into doing something It frightens/​scares/​alarms/​terrifies me that… It frightens/​scares/​alarms/​terrifies me to think, see, etc. See related entries: Fear Word Origin late 16th cent.: from Latin terrificare, from terrificus ‘frightening’, from terrere ‘frighten’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: terrify