Definition of tidy verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

tidy

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈtaɪdi//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈtaɪdi//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they tidy
BrE BrE//ˈtaɪdi//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈtaɪdi//
 
he / she / it tidies
BrE BrE//ˈtaɪdiz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈtaɪdiz//
 
past simple tidied
BrE BrE//ˈtaɪdid//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈtaɪdid//
 
past participle tidied
BrE BrE//ˈtaɪdid//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈtaɪdid//
 
-ing form tidying
BrE BrE//ˈtaɪdiɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈtaɪdiɪŋ//
 
 
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 (tidies, tidying, tidied, tidied) [intransitive, transitive] (especially British English) to make something look neat by putting things in the place where they belong I spent all morning cleaning and tidying. tidy up When you cook, could you please tidy up after yourself. tidy something (up) to tidy (up) a room Word Origin Middle English: from the noun tide + -y. The original meaning was ‘timely, opportune’; it later had various senses expressing approval, usually of a person, including ‘attractive’, ‘healthy’, and ‘skilful’; the sense ‘orderly, neat’ dates from the early 18th cent.Extra examples Go and tidy your toys away. I don’t see why I should have to tidy up after you! I’ve got a bit of cleaning and tidying up to do first. She went downstairs to tidy herself up before dinner. He spent a few minutes tidying his desk. I’ve been tidying my room. She tidied up and washed the dishes. She wanted to tidy herself up before the appointment. She was always cleaning and tidying. When you use the kitchen please tidy up after yourself. Phrasal Verbstidy somethingawaytidy somethingup
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: tidy