English

Definition of train verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    train

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//treɪn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//treɪn//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they train
    BrE BrE//treɪn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//treɪn//
     
    he / she / it trains
    BrE BrE//treɪnz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//treɪnz//
     
    past simple trained
    BrE BrE//treɪnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//treɪnd//
     
    past participle trained
    BrE BrE//treɪnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//treɪnd//
     
    -ing form training
    BrE BrE//ˈtreɪnɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtreɪnɪŋ//
     
    Exercise
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] to teach a person or an animal the skills for a particular job or activity; to be taught in this way train somebody/something badly trained staff train somebody/something to do something They train dogs to sniff out drugs. train (somebody) (as/in/for something) He trained as a teacher before becoming an actor. All members of the team have trained in first aid. train to do/be something Sue is training to be a doctor.
  2. 2  [intransitive, transitive] to prepare yourself/somebody for a particular activity, especially a sport, by doing a lot of exercise; to prepare a person or an animal in this way train (for/in something) athletes training for the Olympics I train in the gym for two hours a day. train somebody/something (for/in something) She trains horses. He trains the Olympic team. See related entries: Exercise
  3. 3[transitive] to develop a natural ability or quality so that it improves train something An expert with a trained eye will spot the difference immediately. train something to do something You can train your mind to think positively.
  4. 4[transitive] train something (around/along/up, etc.) to make a plant grow in a particular direction Roses had been trained around the door.
  5. Word Origin Middle English (as a noun in the sense ‘delay’): from Old French train (masculine), traine (feminine), from trahiner (verb), from Latin trahere ‘pull, draw’. Early noun senses were ‘trailing part of a robe’ and ‘retinue’; the latter gave rise to ‘line of travelling people or vehicles’, later ‘a connected series of things’. The early verb sense ‘cause a plant to grow in a desired shape’ was the basis of the sense ‘instruct’.Extra examples He’s been training seriously for over a year now. The team is training hard for the big match. All members of the team have been trained in first aid. I was impressed by the well trained staff. We watched the athletes training for the Olympics. Phrasal Verbstrain something at somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: train