Definition of travel verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    travel

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈtrævl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrævl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they travel
    BrE BrE//ˈtrævl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrævl//
     
    he / she / it travels
    BrE BrE//ˈtrævlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrævlz//
     
    past simple travelled
    BrE BrE//ˈtrævld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrævld//
     
    past participle travelled
    BrE BrE//ˈtrævld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrævld//
     
    (especially US English) past simple traveled
    BrE BrE//ˈtrævld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrævld//
     
    (especially US English) past participle traveled
    BrE BrE//ˈtrævld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrævld//
     
    -ing form travelling
    BrE BrE//ˈtrævlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrævlɪŋ//
     
    (especially US English) -ing form traveling
    BrE BrE//ˈtrævlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrævlɪŋ//
     
    Basketball
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to go from one place to another, especially over a long distance to travel around the world I go to bed early if I'm travelling the next day. I love travelling by train. We always travel first class. We travelled to California for the wedding. When I finished college I went travelling for six months (= spent time visiting different places). travel something He travelled the length of the Nile in a canoe. I travel 40 miles to work every day.
  2. 2  [intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) to go or move at a particular speed, in a particular direction, or a particular distance to travel at 50 miles an hour Messages travel along the spine from the nerve endings to the brain. News travels fast these days.
  3. 3[intransitive] (of food, wine, an object, etc.) to be still in good condition after a long journey Some wines do not travel well.
  4. 4[intransitive] (+ adv./prep.) (of a book, an idea, etc.) to be equally successful in another place and not just where it began Some writing travels badly in translation.
  5. 5[intransitive] to go fast Their car can really travel!
  6. 6[intransitive] (in basketball) to move while you are holding the ball, in a way that is not allowed See related entries: Basketball
  7. More Like This Consonant-doubling verbs bob, club, dub, grab, rub, sob, throb kid, nod, pad, plod, prod, shred, skid, thud beg, blog, bug, drag, drug, flag, hug, jog, log, mug, nag, plug bar, confer, infer, occur, prefer, refer, star, stir, transfer acquit, admit, allot, chat, clot, commit, jut, knit, pat, regret, rot, spot, submit (in British English:) appal, cancel, channel, control, counsel, enrol, equal, excel, fuel, fulfil, label, level, marvel, model, pedal, quarrel, signal, travelSee worksheet. Word Origin Middle English: a variant of travail, and originally in the same sense.Extra examples He travels back and forth across the Atlantic. He travels with a huge entourage. Hundreds of hospital patients may have to travel long distances for treatment. I always travel first class. I prefer to travel independently. I prefer travelling independently to going on a package holiday. In the film, he travels back in time to the ’50s. She travels light, choosing to use as little equipment as possible. She travels widely in her job. The dissidents were unable to hold meetings or travel freely. The job gives her the opportunity to travel abroad. We decided to travel by car. We had to travel separately as we couldn’t get seats on the same flight. We plan to travel through Thailand and into Cambodia. We travelled through France and into Germany. When I finished college I went travelling for six months. When I finished college I went travelling/traveling for six months= spent time visiting different places. a writer who travels far and wide business people who travel regularly to the US for the holidaymaker who wants to travel further afield information for the backpacker who wants to travel farther afield to travel at the speed of light Al travels over 50 km to work every day. Children under five travel free. He went travelling for six months. Here are some tips on how to keep healthy while you’re travelling. I spent a year travelling around Africa. Is it possible for anything to travel faster than the speed of light? Messages travel from the nerve endings to the brain. More people travel by air than ever before. She travelled the length of the Mekong in a canoe. The truck was travelling at 90 mph when it veered off the road. They seem to be travelling north. We travelled the length and breadth of the country. We’ve travelled a long way in the past few days.Idioms to take very little with you when you go on a trip
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: travel