Definition of veer verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    veer

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//vɪə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//vɪr//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they veer
    BrE BrE//vɪə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//vɪr//
     
    he / she / it veers
    BrE BrE//vɪəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//vɪrz//
     
    past simple veered
    BrE BrE//vɪəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//vɪrd//
     
    past participle veered
    BrE BrE//vɪəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//vɪrd//
     
    -ing form veering
    BrE BrE//ˈvɪərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈvɪrɪŋ//
     
    Driving
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] + adv./prep. (especially of a vehicle) to change direction suddenly synonym swerve The bus veered onto the wrong side of the road. It is still not clear why the missile veered off course. See related entries: Driving
  2. 2[intransitive] + adv./prep. (of a conversation or way of behaving or thinking) to change in the way it develops The debate veered away from the main topic of discussion. His emotions veered between fear and anger.
  3. 3[intransitive] + adv./prep. (specialist) (of the wind) to change direction The wind veered to the west.
  4. Word Origin late 16th cent.: from French virer, perhaps from an alteration of Latin gyrare, from Greek guros ‘a ring’.Extra examples He veered between the extremes of optimism and pessimism. He veered left towards them. His poetry veered dangerously close to sentimentalism. The car veered off the road. The missile veered wildly off course. The path veers sharply to the right. The plane veered away to the left. The play veers from loopy comedy to serious moralizing. The ship veered round wildly in the rough sea.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: veer