Definition of waft verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

waft

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//wɒft//
 
; NAmE NAmE//wɑːft//
 
, NAmE//wæft//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they waft
BrE BrE//wɒft//
 
; NAmE NAmE//wɑːft//
 
, NAmE//wæft//
 
he / she / it wafts
BrE BrE//wɒfts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//wɑːfts//
 
, NAmE//wæfts//
 
past simple wafted
BrE BrE//ˈwɒftɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɑːftɪd//
 
, NAmE//ˈwæftɪd//
 
past participle wafted
BrE BrE//ˈwɒftɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɑːftɪd//
 
, NAmE//ˈwæftɪd//
 
-ing form wafting
BrE BrE//ˈwɒftɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈwɑːftɪŋ//
 
, NAmE//ˈwæftɪŋ//
 
 
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[intransitive, transitive] to move, or make something move, gently through the air synonym drift + adv./prep. The sound of their voices wafted across the lake. Delicious smells wafted up from the kitchen. waft something + adv./prep. The scent of the flowers was wafted along by the breeze. Word Origin early 16th cent. (in the sense ‘escort a ship’): back-formation from obsolete wafter (used only by opponents of the practice) ‘armed convoy vessel’, from Low German, Dutch wachter, from wachten ‘to guard’. A sense ‘convey by water’ gave rise to the current use of the verb.Extra examples A scent of honey wafted up from the hives. Spicy smells wafted through the air. The night air wafted gently over them. Delicious cooking smells wafted up from the kitchen. The scent of the flowers was wafted through the window by the breeze.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: waft

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