Definition of weigh verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    weigh

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//weɪ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//weɪ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they weigh
    BrE BrE//weɪ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//weɪ//
     
    he / she / it weighs
    BrE BrE//weɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//weɪz//
     
    past simple weighed
    BrE BrE//weɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//weɪd//
     
    past participle weighed
    BrE BrE//weɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//weɪd//
     
    -ing form weighing
    BrE BrE//ˈweɪɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈweɪɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  linking verb (+ noun) to have a particular weight How much do you weigh (= how heavy are you)? She weighs 60 kilos. The average male tiger weighs around 200 kg. These cases weigh a ton (= are very heavy).
  2. 2  [transitive] weigh somebody/something/yourself to measure how heavy somebody/something is, usually by using scales He weighed himself on the bathroom scales. She weighed the stone in her hand (= estimated how heavy it was by holding it).
  3. 3[transitive] to consider something carefully before making a decision weigh something (up) You must weigh up the pros and cons (= consider the advantages and disadvantages of something). She weighed up all the evidence. weigh (up) something against something I weighed the benefits of the plan against the risks involved.
  4. 4[intransitive] weigh (with somebody) (against somebody/something) to have an influence on somebody’s opinion or the result of something His past record weighs heavily against him. The evidence weighs in her favour.
  5. 5[transitive] weigh anchor to lift an anchor out of the water and into a boat before sailing away
  6. Word Origin Old English wegan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch wegen ‘weigh’, German bewegen ‘move’, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin vehere ‘convey’. Early senses included ‘transport from one place to another’ and ‘raise up’.Extra examples His untidy appearance weighed against him. The jury weighed up the evidence carefully. This fact weighed heavily in her favour. We weighed the cost of advertising against the likely gains from increased business. How much do you weigh? She weighed the stone in her hand. These cases weigh a ton.Idioms to choose your words carefully so that you say exactly what you mean He spoke slowly, weighing his words. Phrasal Verbsweigh somebodydownweigh down somebodyweigh in (at something)weigh in (with something)weigh on somebodyweigh somethingoutweigh somebodyup
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: weigh