Definition of wreck verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    wreck

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//rek//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rek//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they wreck
    BrE BrE//rek//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rek//
     
    he / she / it wrecks
    BrE BrE//reks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//reks//
     
    past simple wrecked
    BrE BrE//rekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rekt//
     
    past participle wrecked
    BrE BrE//rekt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rekt//
     
    -ing form wrecking
    BrE BrE//ˈrekɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrekɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1wreck something to damage or destroy something The building had been wrecked by the explosion. The road was littered with wrecked cars.
  2. 2wreck something (for somebody) to spoil something completely The weather wrecked all our plans. A serious injury nearly wrecked his career.
  3. 3[usually passive] wreck something to damage a ship so much that it sinks or can no longer sail The ship was wrecked off the coast of France. see also shipwreck
  4. Word Origin Middle English (as a legal term denoting wreckage washed ashore): from Anglo-Norman French wrec, from the base of Old Norse reka ‘to drive’; related to wreak.Extra examples A bomb completely wrecked the building. a crisis that threatens to wreck the peace talks A serious injury in 2006 threatened to wreck his career. His affair wrecked our marriage. Their lives had been wrecked by neglect and abuse. youths who steal and wreck fast cars
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: wreck