English

Definition of wrench verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    wrench

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//rentʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rentʃ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they wrench
    BrE BrE//rentʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rentʃ//
     
    he / she / it wrenches
    BrE BrE//ˈrentʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrentʃɪz//
     
    past simple wrenched
    BrE BrE//rentʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rentʃt//
     
    past participle wrenched
    BrE BrE//rentʃt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rentʃt//
     
    -ing form wrenching
    BrE BrE//ˈrentʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrentʃɪŋ//
     
    Injuries, Love
     
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  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] to pull or twist something/somebody/yourself suddenly and violently synonym jerk wrench (something/somebody/yourself) + adv./prep. The bag was wrenched from her grasp. He grabbed Ben, wrenching him away from his mother. (figurative) Guy wrenched his mind back to the present. wrench (something/somebody/yourself) + adj. They wrenched the door open. She managed to wrench herself free.
  2. 2[transitive] wrench something to twist and injure a part of your body, especially your ankle or shoulder synonym twist She wrenched her knee when she fell. See related entries: Injuries
  3. 3[transitive, intransitive] (formal) to make somebody feel great pain or unhappiness, especially so that they make a sound or cry wrench (something) (from somebody) His words wrenched a sob from her. a wrenching experience wrench at something Her words wrenched at my heart. see also gut-wrenching See related entries: Love
  4. Word Origin late Old English wrencan ‘twist’, of unknown origin.Extra examples He wrenched the handbag from her grasp. I slipped and wrenched my ankle quite badly. She struggled with her captor and managed to wrench herself free. She tried to wrench her arm away. She wrenched the gun out of his hand. She wrenched the lid off the biscuit tin. Suddenly, the door was wrenched open. The child wrenched himself free.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: wrench