American English

Definition of another determiner from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

      

    another

     determiner,pronoun
    determiner, pronoun
    NAmE//əˈnʌðər//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1 one more; an extra thing or person Would you like another drink? “Finished?” “No, I've got another three questions to do.” We've still got another (= a further) forty miles to go. “It's a bill.” “Oh no, not another!” I got another one of those calls yesterday. Another can be followed by a singular noun, by of and a plural noun, or by a number and a plural noun. compare other Language Bankaccording toreporting someone's opinionPhotography is, according to Vidal, the art form of untalented people.For Vidal, photography is the art form of untalented people.His view is that photography is not art but merely the mechanical reproduction of images.Smith takes the view that photography is both an art and a science.In Brown's view, photography should be treated as a legitimate art in its own right.James is of the opinion that a good painter can always be a good photographer if he or she so decides.Emerson believed that a photograph should reflect only what the human eye can see.
  2. 2different; a different person or thing Let's do it another time. We need another computer (= a new one). We can try that—but whether it'll work is another matter. The room's too small. Let's see if they've got another one. I don't like this room. I'm going to ask for another.
  3. 3a person or thing of a very similar type She's going to be another Madonna (= as famous as her). There'll never be another like him. see also one another
  4. Idioms
    of one kind, type, etc. or another
     
    jump to other results
    used when you are referring to various types of a thing, without saying exactly what you mean We've all got problems of one kind or another.
    one after another/the other
     
    jump to other results
    first one person or thing, and then another, and then another, up to any number or amount The bills kept coming in, one after another.
See the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary entry: another