Definition of lot adverb from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

     

    lot

     adverb
    adverb
    NAmE//lɑt//
     
    (informal)
     
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  1. 1a lot (informal lots) used with adjectives and adverbs to mean “much” I'm feeling a lot better today. I eat lots less than I used to.
  2. 2a lot used with verbs to mean “a great amount” I care a lot about you. Thanks a lot for your help. I play tennis quite a lot (= often) in the summer. Grammarmuch / a lot of / lots ofMuch is used only with uncountable nouns. It is used mainly in questions and negative sentences:Do you have much free time? How much experience do you have? I don’t have much free time.In statements a lot of or lots of (informal) is much more common:She earns a lot of money.You can also use plenty (of). These phrases can also be used in questions and negative sentences.A lot of/lots of is still felt to be informal, especially in writing, so in formal writing it is better to use much, a great deal of, or a large amount of.Very much and a lot can be used as adverbs:I miss my family very much. I miss very much my family. I miss my family a lot. Thanks a lot.In negative sentences you can use much:I didn’t enjoy the movie (very) much.
See the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary entry: lot