American English

Definition of tow verb from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

 

tow

 verb
verb
NAmE//toʊ//
 
tow something (away)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they tow
 
he / she / it tows
 
past simple towed
 
-ing form towing
 
 
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to pull a car or boat behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain Our car was towed away by the police. see also tow bar, tow rope Thesauruspulldrag draw haul tow tugThese words all mean to move something in a particular direction, especially toward or behind you.pull to hold something and move it in a particular direction; to hold or be attached to a vehicle and move it along behind you:Pull the chair closer to the table. They use horses to pull their carts.drag to pull someone or something in a particular direction or behind you, usually along the ground, and especially with effort:The sack is too heavy to lift—you'll have to drag it.draw (formal) to move someone or something by pulling them/it gently; to pull a vehicle such as a carriage:I drew my chair closer to the fire. a horse-drawn carriagehaul to pull someone or something to a particular place with a lot of effort:Liz hauled her suitcase up the stairs.drag or haul?You usually drag something behind you along the ground; you usually haul something toward you, often upward toward you. Dragging something often needs effort, but hauling something always does.tow to pull a car, boat, or light plane behind another vehicle, using a rope or chain:Our car was towed away by the police.tug to pull someone or something hard in a particular direction:The boy tugged at his father's sleeve.Patterns to pull/drag/draw/haul/tow somebody/something along/down/toward something to pull/drag/draw/haul/tow somebody/something behind you to pull/drag/draw/haul a cart/sled to pull/draw a coach/carriage to pull/haul/tow a trailer horses pull/draw/haul something dogs pull/drag/haul something
See the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary entry: tow