English

Definition of address verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    address

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//əˈdres//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈdres//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they address
    BrE BrE//əˈdres//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈdres//
     
    he / she / it addresses
    BrE BrE//əˈdresɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈdresɪz//
     
    past simple addressed
    BrE BrE//əˈdrest//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈdrest//
     
    past participle addressed
    BrE BrE//əˈdrest//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈdrest//
     
    -ing form addressing
    BrE BrE//əˈdresɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//əˈdresɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [usually passive] to write on an envelope, etc. the name and address of the person, company, etc. that you are sending it to by mail address something The letter was correctly addressed, but delivered to the wrong house. address something to somebody/something Address your application to the Personnel Manager. compare readdress see also sae, SASE
  2. 2to make a formal speech to a group of people to address a meeting The President has been asked to address the assembly.
  3. 3(formal) to say something directly to somebody address somebody I was surprised when he addressed me in English. address something to somebody Any questions should be addressed to your teacher. The book is addressed to the general reader.
  4. 4address somebody (as something) to use a particular name or title for somebody when you speak or write to them There are different ways in which to address a member of the royal family. The judge should be addressed as ‘Your Honour’. In Britain, a surgeon is addressed as ‘Mr’ not ‘Dr’.
  5. 5(formal) to think about a problem or a situation and decide how you are going to deal with it address something Your essay does not address the real issues. address yourself to something We must address ourselves to the problem of traffic pollution.
  6. Word Origin Middle English (as a verb in the senses ‘set upright’ and ‘guide, direct’, hence ‘write directions for delivery on’ and ‘direct spoken words to’): from Old French, based on Latin ad- ‘towards’ + directus past participle of dirigere, from di- ‘distinctly’ or de- ‘down’ + regere ‘put straight’. The noun is of mid 16th-cent. origin in the sense ‘act of approaching or speaking to someone’.Extra examples He addressed his comments to the chairman. He never addressed her directly. In the long run it is far cheaper to address the needs of poor people than to ignore them. Please send a stamped addressed envelope and we will send you a copy of our brochure. She did not address him by name. The authors of the book address themselves to the question of unemployment. The labour movement has always addressed issues of the quality of life. The minister did not reply to my letter although I addressed it to him personally. These concerns were not adequately addressed in the report. the problems we are seeking to address All remarks have to be addressed to the chair. How should I address her? Please address my client by his full name, Mr Babic. The message was specifically addressed to the younger generation.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: address