English

Definition of agitate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    agitate

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈædʒɪteɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈædʒɪteɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they agitate
    BrE BrE//ˈædʒɪteɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈædʒɪteɪt//
     
    he / she / it agitates
    BrE BrE//ˈædʒɪteɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈædʒɪteɪts//
     
    past simple agitated
    BrE BrE//ˈædʒɪteɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈædʒɪteɪtɪd//
     
    past participle agitated
    BrE BrE//ˈædʒɪteɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈædʒɪteɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form agitating
    BrE BrE//ˈædʒɪteɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈædʒɪteɪtɪŋ//
     
    Anger
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to argue strongly for something you want, especially for changes in a law, in social conditions, etc. synonym campaign agitate (for/against something) political groups agitating for social change Some militant groups have been agitating for autonomy for the region. agitate to do something Her family are agitating to have her transferred to a prison in the UK.
  2. 2[transitive] agitate somebody to make somebody feel angry, anxious or nervous This remark seemed to agitate her guest. Richard felt agitated by a mixture of anger, fear and pleasure. See related entries: Anger
  3. 3[transitive] agitate something (specialist) to make something, especially a liquid, move around by stirring or shaking it Agitate the mixture to dissolve the powder.
  4. Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘drive away’): from Latin agitat- ‘agitated, driven’, from agitare, frequentative of agere ‘do, drive’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: agitate